Biden on Senate Bipartisan Infrastructure Plan: 'We Have a Deal'

The plan, initially proposed by five Democratic and five Republican senators, calls for $1.2 billion in spending over 8 years. Biden wants to see a much larger plan in a second bill, which could potentially sink the package.

2 minute read

June 27, 2021, 7:00 AM PDT

By Irvin Dawid


Biden Administration

archna nautiyal / Shutterstock

"President Biden struck an infrastructure deal on Thursday with a bipartisan group of senators, signing on to their plan to provide about $579 billion in new investments in roads, broadband internet, electric utilities and other projects in hopes of moving a crucial piece of his economic agenda through Congress," report Emily CochraneJim Tankersley, and Jonathan Weisman for The New York Times on June 24.

Mr. Biden noted that the deal includes about two-thirds of the funding that he had called for in several parts of his American Jobs Plan, in areas like clean power and environmental resilience.

However, the president made it clear that the "human infrastructure," such as child care and elder care services included in his jobs plan, needs to proceed in addition to the "physical infrastructure" in the bipartisan proposal.

“If this is the only thing that comes to me, I’m not signing it,” Mr. Biden said during remarks in the East Room of the White House. “It’s in tandem.”

Celebrating a deal would appear to be premature at best. The Times' reporters note some of the hurdles facing the Senate:

It’s not clear, though, that the bipartisan plan ...will muster the support of at least 60 senators to overcome any filibuster. And the two-track strategy promises to be a heavy lift for Democrats in a Congress where they have only the thinnest of majorities, and moderates and progressives have very different priorities.

"The bipartisan package must now win the support of progressive Democrats and conservative Republicans, while the broader 'human infrastructure' bill — likely to be routed through the legislative reconciliation process — must attract support from all 50 Senate Democrats to win passage," writes Quint Forgey for POLITICO.

Thursday, June 24, 2021 in The New York Times

Single-family homes in a suburban neighborhood in Florida.

New Florida Law Curbs HOA Power

The legislation seeks to cut down on ‘absurd’ citations for low-level violations.

June 16, 2024 - The Guardian

Multistory apartment building under construction.

New Tennessee Law Allows No-Cost Incentives for Affordable Housing

Local governments in the Volunteer State can now offer developers incentives like increased density, lower parking requirements, and priority permitting for affordable housing projects.

June 10, 2024 - Nooga Today

Pumping Gas

10 States Where the Gas Tax Is Highest

As the gap between gas tax revenue and transportation funding needs widen across the country, the funding mechanism is drawing increased scrutiny from both public officials and consumers.

June 9, 2024 - The Ascent

Brick high-rise apartment buildings in New York City

Study: Housing Crisis is About Affordability, not Supply

New research shows that there is no overall shortage of housing units, but all U.S. metropolitan areas face a severe lack of affordable units for low-income renters.

6 hours ago - University of Kansas

Couple on one side of desk with banker on other side looking at paperwork.

Are Race-Based Lawsuits Affecting Community Lenders?

Shelterforce spoke with community lending leaders and experts about the current mood across the sector. What, if anything, are organizations doing to avoid becoming the next target of conservative activists?

7 hours ago - Shelterforce Magazine

Rendering of Glory Park in Lewisville, Texas.

New Park Promotes Community and Connectivity in Lewisville, Texas

The city of Lewisville just celebrated the opening of Glory Park/Parque la Gloria, helping to improve park access and the quality of life for residents.

June 18 - Lewisville Leader

Urban Design for Planners 1: Software Tools

This six-course series explores essential urban design concepts using open source software and equips planners with the tools they need to participate fully in the urban design process.

Planning for Universal Design

Learn the tools for implementing Universal Design in planning regulations.