Proposal Would Connect the High Line to the New Moynihan Train Hall

The High Line has a chance to add the role of civic connector to its list of plaudits.

Read Time: 2 minutes

January 12, 2021, 5:00 AM PST

By James Brasuell @CasualBrasuell


High Line

photosounds / Shutterstock

Mihir Zaveri and Daniel E. Slotnik report: "Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said on Sunday that the High Line will be extended to connect to the newly opened Moynihan Train Hall, a project that he said help spur development in the surrounding neighborhoods and boost an economy facing a deep crisis because of the pandemic."

The Moynihan Train Hall opened on January 1, but already these plans promise to connect the newer facility to one of the most recognizable symbols of contemporary New York City.  

The proposed link between the High Line and the new train station will create another access point for the station: "A 1,200-foot elevated walkway will connect the existing High Line at 30th Street to a pedestrian path at Manhattan West, a mixed used development adjacent to the train hall," according to the article.

The Moynihan connection isn't the High Line extension plan in the works by the state of New York. " The state is also eyeing another possible expansion of the High Line to connect it north to Pier 76 on West 38th Street, where Mr. Cuomo wants to turn a Police Department tow pound into another park. The existing High Line travels 1.45 miles from 34th Street south to Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District," report Zaveri and Slotnik.

The article references questions raised about spending priorities during the pandemic and aftermath. Gov. Cuomo explained how the state will finance the project.

"Mr. Cuomo, acknowledging that the state was facing severe financial difficulties because of the pandemic, said that its portion of the cost would come from infrastructure funds that could not be used to help address budget shortfalls. He said the state was also expecting aid from the federal government for infrastructure projects after Joseph R. Biden Jr. becomes president."

Monday, January 11, 2021 in The New York Times

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