Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Smart Growth

Blog post
4 days ago
Let's rely on science, not ideology and propaganda, when planning solutions to urban unaffordability. Look for credible evidence in the peer-reviewed publications referenced here.
Todd Litman
May 3, 2021, 12pm PDT
Smart policies can ensure that low- and moderate-income households can find suitable housing in good neighborhoods where transportation costs are low. The research is clear: upzoning works.
Governing
Blog post
March 15, 2021, 9am PDT

A complete community includes an optimal mix of people, activities, and transport modes in each neighborhood. Like a chef, planners need the right ingredients. Here is the recipe.

Todd Litman
February 14, 2021, 11am PST
What does it mean to be a 15-minute city?
CNU Public Square
Blog post
January 31, 2021, 9am PST

Communities have good reasons to protect trees and forests. Planners can help make this happen.

Todd Litman
October 21, 2020, 11am PDT
The National Association of Realtors' recent Community and Transportation Preference Survey shows that many households prefer living in walkable urban neighborhoods, and those that do have a higher quality of life.
2020 Community and Transportation Preference Survey
October 19, 2020, 10am PDT
The new 15-Minute City App generates maps which show the number of services and activities within a 15 minute walk, and and therefore whether an area can be considered a 15-minute neighborhood.
15-minute City Map
Blog post
July 28, 2020, 11am PDT
New Zealand’s new national urban development policy prohibits parking minimums and increases allowable building heights near transit stations. This is a watershed moment for the country’s cities and towns.
Todd Litman
July 1, 2020, 12pm PDT
At long last, California law will consider the amount of driving, rather than vehicle delay, when evaluating the environmental impacts of new developments. This is a more common-sense approximation of their environmental impacts.
Streetsblog California
Blog post
March 5, 2020, 5am PST
In a modern, post-industrial society, economic opportunity depends on disadvantaged households’ ability to find suitable housing in an economically successful city. Planners can make that happen.
Todd Litman
December 3, 2019, 6am PST
Can't tell New Urbanism from YIMBY? This post tries to help.
Greater Greater Washington
Blog post
October 8, 2019, 5am PDT
Many jurisdictions have vehicle travel reduction targets. Integrated Smart Growth policies can help achieve these and other planning goals.
Todd Litman
September 22, 2019, 11am PDT
San Francisco is planning for new population growth and new housing developments on the West Side of the city, and is also expecting high quality public transit to fill the mobility needs of current and future residents.
San Francisco Examiner
September 6, 2019, 10am PDT
The Vision 2050 plan, which charts the growth for King, Pierce, Snohomish, and Kitsap counties in Washington State, would focus almost all the growth meant to accommodate 1.8 million new residents inside urban areas.
The Urbanist
Blog post
February 20, 2019, 5am PST

It is important to focus on forests rather than individual trees when evaluating trade-offs between infill and sprawled development.

Todd Litman
February 1, 2019, 2pm PST
As more people head to Idaho to escape cities they cannot afford, Boise is encouraging growth and also grappling with the consequences.
Curbed
October 30, 2018, 2pm PDT
Charles Wolfe calls attention to similarities between contemporary urbanism and yesterday's debunked utopias. The two may differ in substance, but both tend toward a certain level of dogma that isn't necessarily helpful on the ground.
Public Square: A CNU Journal
Blog post
September 4, 2018, 6am PDT
Conventional planning is static, designed to lock in existing land use patterns. We need more dynamic planning to respond to changing household needs and community goals.
Todd Litman
August 10, 2018, 2pm PDT
Breakthrough Institute co-founder, Ted Nordhaus, explores the etymology of "carrying capacity" from a shipping term to a biological term, but objects to its application to human population. Richard Heinberg of the Post Carbon Institute responds.
Aeon
July 5, 2018, 2pm PDT
The U.S. has lower average life expectancy than most peer countries. New research indicates that this results in part from sprawl. Life expectancy, economic mobility, mobility options, personal health and safety all improve in less sprawling areas.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health