Wastewater

December 6, 2011, 2pm PST
The EPA estimates the U.S. has $13 billion in wastewater infrastructure. Fast Company explains how innovations in wastewater management using natural processes will change everything.
Fast Company
Blog post
August 26, 2011, 10pm PDT

Much of the inefficiency surrounding our use and misuse of water derive from entrenched habits formed during previous eras of presumed inexhaustibility of water supplies.  Our wastewater treatment approach has traditionally relied on an infrastructure of centralized municipal water plants where tertiary effluent is recycled.  These plants consume considerable energy and cost to restore all of the water they process.  

Rick Abelson
April 28, 2011, 7am PDT
Buildings in Seattle, including a school, are trying to remove themselves from the urban water grid. More could soon follow.
The Seattle Times
September 14, 2010, 10am PDT
Urban runoff and contaminated water are creating major ecological damage, even in the United States. One design competition has the goal of rethinking how we handle this crucial resource.
Metropolis
April 17, 2010, 5am PDT
In many cities, stormwater and sewage water are collected in the same sewer. As a result, good rainwater is combined with dirty sewage water. Overflows can create major problems for cities. But avoiding those problems is not exactly easy.
Urban Omnibus
February 11, 2010, 9am PST
This post from IBM's <em>A Smarter Planet</em> blog looks at how advanced monitoring techniques and analytics are helping to improve the management of sewage and wastewater in cities like Sacramento and Dubuque.
A Smarter Planet
February 11, 2010, 5am PST
This piece from <em>Urban Re:Vision Magazine</em> looks at a variety of water reuse and stormwater capture projects in cities across the U.S.
Urban Re:Vision
August 27, 2009, 5am PDT
Farmers in the Monterey Bay area of California have been feeding their artichoke plants with recycled urban wastewater. And they've been doing it safely for years.
Miller-McCune
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