Cloud Computing Company Will Have its Name in the Clouds above San Francisco

It is only fitting that Salesforce, whose logo is a cloud, won the naming rights to what will be the West Coast's tallest building when completed in 2017 where they will lease half the space. When the fog rolls in, that's all the workers will see!

Read Time: 2 minutes

April 14, 2014, 6:00 AM PDT

By Irvin Dawid


Salesforce, whose logo as well as business is cloud-related, is San Francisco's largest technology employer. In a "landmark real estate deal, it will lease half of the planned Transbay Tower, now to become the Salesforce Tower thanks to a naming rights agreement - when the 61-story skyscraper is completed in 2017," write Ellen Huet and John Coté.

In 2010, two years before the city approved plans for the tower, "then-Mayor Gavin Newsom was already envisioning Salesforce as an anchor tenant - waxing poetic about the company's logo perched atop the highest building in the city", add Huet and Coté.

In fact, as we noted in 2012 when the tower was approved, the 1,070-foot tower will also be the tallest on the West Coast, surpassing the U.S. Bank Tower at 1,018 feet by 52 feet. However, the ranking may not last long, if at all, as L.A.'s 71-story Wilshire Grand Tower at 1,121 feet, is also expected to be completed in 2017.

The centerpiece of the Transbay Transit Center will hopefully be the new $4.5 billion Transbay Terminal (renamed the Transit Center), what some have dubbed "America's Next Great Train Station". However, when the center is completed by 2017, it will not have the two rail tenants, Caltrain and High Speed Rail. But if you need to catch a bus to the East Bay, North Bay, Peninsula or the Greyhound, your needs will be met.

Friday, April 11, 2014 in San Francisco Chronicle

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