Government / Politics

November 4, 2008, 8am PST
Democrats are in cities and Republicans are in rural areas, according to the results of recent elections. But with two metropolitan candidates in this year's election and an increasingly urbanized populace, that split may become obsolete.
Citiwire
November 3, 2008, 1pm PST
With rising energy prices, lights are dimming in New York City. Legislation in the state seeks to reduce the city's glow even more.
The New York Times
November 3, 2008, 10am PST
A federal judge has put the kibosh on New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's plan to require taxi companies to use mostly hybrid vehicles by 2012.
New York Times
November 2, 2008, 7am PST
City Limits breaks down the differences between the two presidential candidates with a focus on urban issues.
City Limits
Blog post
November 2, 2008, 6am PST

With due respect to Frederick Jackson Turner, the American frontier closes on Tuesday.  This time, for good.

Josh Stephens
November 1, 2008, 11am PDT
Huge victory for road safety and the California Bicycle Coalition was scored when CA Gov. Schwarzenegger signed 'Complete Streets Act' in September.
CalBike Report
Blog post
October 31, 2008, 5pm PDT

Since arriving in Vancouver, I've realized that we are part of a "peer group" of international water cities. Through waterfront design conferences where the same cities seem to get invited time and time again, or through deeper and more interactive collegial opportunities for shared learning such as summits or study trips, these global water cities are taking every opportunity to learn from each other's successes and failures around water-edge planning and design. 

Brent Toderian
Blog post
October 31, 2008, 10am PDT

The most recent bicycle counts from two of America's most progressive cities, New York City and Portland, have been made public. The results are impressive as much as they are instructive.

Mike Lydon
October 30, 2008, 1pm PDT
David Morris of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance wonders if the economic crisis will see alternative energy fall off the political agenda, or if the next president will recognize the economic benefits of renewable energy investments.
AlterNet
October 30, 2008, 7am PDT
Preservationists say that there are better ways to use buildings along Brooklyn's industrial waterfront than to demolish them.
The New York Times
October 29, 2008, 2pm PDT
China's Communist ruling party has agreed to allow farmers to transfer land use rights for farming. The plan is designed to consolidate landholdings, discourage uneconomic farmers, and boost rural incomes for 750 million people.
Christian Science Monitor
October 29, 2008, 9am PDT
Decades of plans and interventions have failed to improve the Downtown East Side of Vancouver, one of Canada's most notorious neighbourhoods. The two mayoral candidates have very different visions for the DETS.
Globe and Mail
October 29, 2008, 7am PDT
If history is any indicator, Senator Obama's presidential plans to pump more federal money into fixing cities' problems are futile and wasteful, according to Steven Malanga.
City Journal
October 28, 2008, 12pm PDT
New Orleans residents this Election Day will decide whether to grant the "force of law" to the city's master plan, making it more difficult for officials to make amendments and exceptions for specific projects. The master plan has yet to be written.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
Blog post
October 28, 2008, 11am PDT

This morning I was reading through my daily dose of planning related blogs and dropped in on The Overhead Wire, Jeff Wood's excellent transit soapbox. One of Jeff's most recent posts links to an October 25th Reuters article announcing China's $272 billion dollar investment in new rail infrastructure. Yes, you read that correctly. 272 billion. Can't you see president Hu Jintao bringing his pinky to his lips, à la Dr. Evil?

Mike Lydon
Blog post
October 28, 2008, 6am PDT

Here in New York City, there is an incredibly popular burger stand in Madison Square Park called The Shake Shack. It's one of the touchpoints for Silicon Alley, and a great meet-up spot. The problem is that its usually insanely crowded, with an hour-long line stretching well across the park.

Not to be defeated, Silicon Alley geeks created the Shake Shack Twitter Bot, which serves as a sort of chat room for people to report wait times at the Shake Shack. It's a few dozen lines of code that leverages Web 2.0 technology to make the city smarter, more efficient, and more fun.

Anthony Townsend
October 27, 2008, 5am PDT
The next president should take farming seriously and personally, according to Neal Pierce, who writes that rethinking the scale of food production is smart for regions, the environment and the economy.
Citiwire
October 26, 2008, 5am PDT
A single bike activist, tired of being honked at by motorists as they passed her in a narrow lane, lobbied her small city for a sign directing motorists to "change lanes to pass", and got it. Motorists have since ceased honking and changed lanes.
The Examiner
October 25, 2008, 7am PDT
The San Francisco County Transportation Authority is calling for the elimination of auto levels of service (LOS) as a criteria under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).
coolconnections.org
October 24, 2008, 2pm PDT
The next president must commit to fixing our infrastructure, says Dave Demerjian of Wired. Such an investment will create jobs, strengthen our economy and make America more competitive.
Wired.com