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Alabama

November 18, 2020, 10am PST
In rural Alabama, a long history of racial inequality and poverty has left people struggling to survive in uninhabitable housing.
The New York Times
September 14, 2020, 6am PDT
Public meetings often disprove the notion that communities have a unified stance on any issue. With this in mind, we must move past trying to find consensus and focus on uplifting the most marginalized voices.
Shelterforce Magazine
May 27, 2020, 10am PDT
The terminology of the coronavirus pandemic isn't applied consistently, particularly when dealing with areas seeing a resurgence of infection after states have relaxed social distancing restrictions. The World Health Organization added some clarity.
Reuters
March 24, 2020, 5am PDT
Amtrak service between New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama, stopped after Hurricane Katrina. But recent efforts point to restored service in the coming years.
T4America Blog
February 6, 2020, 10am PST
Cities in the South are facing a multitude of climate change impacts, but many have been slow to respond to the growing threats.
The State
January 14, 2020, 11am PST
A reapportionment of House of Representatives will begin when the results of the Census 2020 have been finalized. A new analysis indicates that ten House seats will likely shift from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South.
Citiwire
Feature
August 26, 2019, 5am PDT
A good friendship is a two-way street. So how come our relationships with places only involve taking and no giving?
Lev Kushner
August 24, 2019, 5am PDT
Birmingham, Alabama is buying 15 new buses to run on a planned bus rapid transit route.
ABC 33/40
June 17, 2019, 1pm PDT
Mobile, Alabama, has changed the way it deals with blight, and the results have been substantial.
Fast Company
March 31, 2019, 7am PDT
Thanks to bipartisan cooperation and strong leadership from Gov. Kay Ivey, the Heart of Dixie passed it first fuel tax hike in 27 years. The 21 cents per gallon tax will increase by 10 cents in three increments by 2021 and then indexed to inflation.
AL.com
November 15, 2018, 1pm PST
With very little of its residential population or employment centers accessible by public transit, Birmingham is looking to microtransit to potentially reduce single-occupancy vehicles use in the city.
Smart Cities Dive
September 4, 2018, 2pm PDT
The Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opened in April, are worthy memorials to one of the nation's greatest tragedies, according to this review.
The Dallas Morning News
August 28, 2018, 7am PDT
A research program at Auburn University in Alabama seeks to go national, but experience from the program’s evolution means a cautious move forward.
Dwell
June 25, 2018, 7am PDT
Plans for temporary facilities designed to house between 25,000 to 45,000 people have been revealed by Time Magazine. Sites in Alabama, Arizona, California,
Time
April 5, 2018, 2pm PDT
Despite the increasing number and intensity of natural disasters, some vulnerable states are relaxing building regulations and leaving the federal government to pick up the tab when tragedy strikes again.
Bloomberg
December 16, 2017, 5am PST
If you want to understand rural America, critics say, look beyond Hillbilly Elegy.
Chitucky
December 5, 2017, 10am PST
If California is going to address its chronic housing shortage, single-family residential neighborhoods can no longer be ruled "off limits." Opposition to a small Berkeley subdivision spawned new housing legislation and fostered the YIMBY movement.
The New York Times
October 8, 2017, 5am PDT
Nate will make landfall southeast of New Orleans on Saturday night as possibly a category 2 hurricane after leaving at least 22 dead in Central America. It's not so much the levees but the pumps and generators that have city officials worried.
The New York Times
May 17, 2017, 9am PDT
Water bills are going up because pipes put in shortly after World War II are in need of repair and replacement all over the country, and federal funding for water is shrinking.
Vox
November 9, 2016, 11am PST
It used to be that only New Orleans and Las Vegas allowed people to carry a drink outdoors and imbibe in public. Now cities all over the country, mostly in traditionally conservative states, are loosening their laws.
Stateline