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Globalization

September 14, 2019, 11am PDT
Air conditioning has drastically changed modern life and the ways cities have developed. But, the environmental consequences are immense, and it’s time to cut back.
The Guardian
June 12, 2019, 2pm PDT
It might feel like the world is shrinking as globalization expands, but many cities still have their individual characters and qualities.
Bloomberg
January 18, 2019, 5am PST
As cities define our world in new ways every day, Penn Institute for Urban Research asked nearly dozen urban experts, “Why cities?”
Penn IUR Urban Link
September 20, 2018, 8am PDT
In a new book, Hans Westlund and Tigran Haas argue that the global knowledge economy is radically reshaping urban development. Eventually, they say, it'll render meaningless our present notions of "urban," "suburban," and "rural."
Regional Studies Association
October 17, 2014, 7am PDT
#Everydayeverywhere is an Instagram hashtag connecting ordinary photographs from all over the world, which Nicole Crowder covered recently for the Washington Post's photography blog, In Sight.
The Washington Post
May 7, 2014, 7am PDT
According to an opinion piece by Mimi Zeiger, "urban magistrates are appearing more frequently as personas on the architectural scene as designers tackle questions of the fate of the city." What can design-savvy mayors offer architects?
Dezeen
January 15, 2014, 8am PST
A new study out of Oxford’s Saïd Business School provides evidence of the influence of external factors, such as foreign wars and environmental crises, on the London housing market.
Quartz
October 16, 2013, 8am PDT
Toronto's suburbs have often been dismissed as bland and banal. A closer look, however, reveals a diverse, complex landscape whose rapid changes have profound implications for the metropolis as a whole.
Satellite Magazine
May 6, 2013, 5am PDT
In the pre-modern era, city-states were the engines of global trade and diplomacy. As rapid urbanization drives globalization outside the structures of international frameworks, cities are returning to the fore as transnational actors.
Quartz
December 9, 2012, 11am PST
In a globalized world, China's economic, environmental and urban development has implications for us all, posits Henry M. Paulson Jr. The problems the country faces, and any potential solutions, revolve around its approach to urbanization.
The New York Times
April 26, 2012, 9am PDT
In the era of globalization and increased connectivity, which was once predicted to loosen our bonds to place, Saffron Woodcraft argues that cities have become more, not less, significant.
Urban Times
April 25, 2012, 2pm PDT
In an interview with the <em>Journal of International Affairs</em>, Rem Koolhaas discusses the effects of globalization on architectural practice and cultural identity, and what city he thinks will be the "Rosetta Stone" of the 21st century.
Next American City
February 18, 2012, 11am PST
Jonathan Massey pens an essay in the journal <em>Places</em>, in which he probes the implications of homeownership as the vehicle by which the microeconomics of household finance and the macroeconomics of a globalized economy are mediated.
Places
January 23, 2012, 9am PST
Apple's decision to performs most of its engineering and manufacturing overseas, highlights how the US government and the US manufacturing industry can no longer compete internationally. " 'Made in the U.S.A.' is no longer a viable option."
The New York Times
June 28, 2011, 1pm PDT
<em>National Geographic Traveler</em> talks with urban theorist Richard Florida about the changing roles of cities, and the emerging centers of economic prosperity.
National Geographic Traveler
December 11, 2010, 7am PST
Victor David Hanson uses a broad historical perspective to examine the causes of the rise and fall of former world cities. He argues that the computer driven, global age will accelerate the process of growth and decline.
City Journal
March 10, 2010, 7am PST
Slate continues its series on wayfinding with the little-known story of the symbolic conflicts among the U.S., the former Soviet Union and Japan over how to direct people in a time of crisis.
Slate
May 20, 2009, 9am PDT
With globalization meaning goods can be shipped cheaply anywhere, and the internet means you can work anywhere, why are cities growing like crazy? Prof. Edward L. Glaeser of Harvard says that proximity breeds innovation.
The New York Times
September 12, 2008, 9am PDT
Outsourcing work to China has gotten costlier due to increasing fuel and labor costs. As a result, some American companies are pondering a return to Mexico to manufacture their goods instead.
The Christian Science Monitor
August 5, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>Alex Steffen of WorldChanging proposes that globalization could soon change direction as transportation costs increase.</p>
WorldChanging