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Academic Studies

Yesterday
The people living in urban heat islands are much more likely to be inhabited by low-income people of color, and the roots of the environmental justice issue can be found in planning history.
The Oregonian
January 7, 2020, 7am PST
New analysis of National Household Travel Survey data shows that the United States has a long way to go to overcome the dominance of the automobile for daily travel.
Journal of Transport & Health via ScienceDirect
December 31, 2019, 7am PST
A new metric for measuring land use regulation traces the evolution of land use regulations over the past decade, finding that U.S. municipalities on a net basis adopted slightly more restrictive land use regulations from 2006 to 2018.
The National Bureau of Economic Research
December 10, 2019, 10am PST
An analysis of 1,295,160 citations of urban planning research over the past year.
Tom Sanchez
November 22, 2019, 2pm PST
A news study raises questions about the public health effects of the widespread availability of a ride enabled by companies like Uber and Lyft—while it's easier to avoid drunk driving, it's also easier to drink.
The Economist
November 16, 2019, 11am PST
Have you ever heard of the Salish Sea? Neither have most of the people who live near it, in cities named Seattle and Vancouver.
Phys.org
October 21, 2019, 5am PDT
New research finds that different types of parks correlate with different gentrification effects, adding to the complexity of urban change.
CityLab
Feature
September 30, 2019, 6am PDT
Thirty years after a seminal study attempted to connect increased density with decreased automobile use, several new studies are raising doubts about that central assumption of contemporary planning.
Fanis Grammenos
September 24, 2019, 2pm PDT
Inclusionary zoning can't work because of the exclusionary zoning policies that the system relies on, according to new research.
Mercatus Center
July 2, 2019, 6am PDT
A new study by researchers at Illinois State University and the University of Michigan measured the informal footpaths—also known as "desire lines"—of Detroit.
Landscape And Urban Planning
June 24, 2019, 11am PDT
Are 'zero carbon' goals the most effective way to cut greenhouse gases, or are they the most politically feasible strategies? NPR climate and environment reporter, Nathan Rott, explores the challenge in an interview on All Things Considered.
NPR
April 23, 2019, 11am PDT
Results of a new survey suggest that there are benefits to be reaped from a focus on climate change.
CityLab
March 28, 2019, 8am PDT
A book by Loretta Lees and Martin Phillips, published in 2018, is reviewed and recommended to "graduates studying anthropology of cities, urbanism, geography, and new urban identities."
Electronic Green Journal
March 1, 2019, 11am PST
Two urban and regional planning faculty at the University of Michigan's Taubman College, Assistant Professor Robert Goodspeed and Professor Emerita Margaret Dewar, were awarded a grant to study data on evictions in Michigan.
University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
February 28, 2019, 5am PST
It's not all free flowing commutes and world peace in an autonomous vehicle-filled future.
Futurism
February 22, 2019, 5am PST
The definitions of suburban chosen by researchers tend to fall into three categories—and each has a significant impact and the results of academic inquiry.
Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
February 21, 2019, 1pm PST
Some good news, and some bad, on the effect of bike-share programs on transit ridership.
Smart Cities Dive
February 13, 2019, 5am PST
New research is ambivalent about the potential for streetcar investments to reap promised economic development rewards.
PhysOrg
February 11, 2019, 7am PST
It's hard to connect zoning to planning and development outcomes at a national level because very little data exists at that scale.
Urban Institute
February 8, 2019, 2pm PST
A new study by researchers from Harvard University addresses bike equity, which is a powerful tool for increasing access to transportation and reducing inequality in U.S. cities
The Conversation