L.A. Failing to Reach Vision Zero Goals

The city has seen a rise in car crash deaths since implementing its Vision Zero initiative. Advocates say not enough action is being taken to make streets safer.
May 9, 2019, 9am PDT | Camille Fink
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More than three years ago Los Angeles adopted a Vision Zero strategy, part of a global initiative to make streets safer and eliminate traffic fatalities. "But rather than decline, fatal car crashes have risen 32% since 2015, the year Vision Zero began. In that time, more people have died in traffic collisions — 932 — than were shot to death in the city, according to coroner’s data," reports Laura J. Nelson.

City officials say they have been analyzing crash data, identifying dangerous streets and intersections, and making changes, including adjusting signal timing, painting crosswalks, and installing posts to slow down vehicles. Additional larger projects involve new signals, sidewalks, and protected bike lanes.

"But Vision Zero has not reduced fatalities enough to meet its early benchmarks, including the 20% reduction in deaths that the city should have achieved in 2017. Without a greater sense of urgency among drivers and elected officials, advocates say, Los Angeles will not come close to eliminating traffic deaths by 2025," notes Nelson.

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Published on Thursday, April 25, 2019 in Los Angeles Times
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