Exclusives

Feature
2 days ago
The path to business success occasionally passes through the garage—famously demonstrated by industry titans like Amazon or Hewlett Packard. Zoning codes should encourage, not obstruct, these kinds of American success stories.
Olivia Gonzalez
Blog post
May 19, 2004, 4pm PDT
The Geospatial Information & Technology Association has published their sixth annual survey of organizations implementing
geospatial information technologies. While the full report is $145, a free excerpt from the Executive Summary is available online.

One interesting question posed by the report: Given the strong interest in "Web-based GIS, could the industry be preparing for a dramatic increase in outsourcing of GIS to third-party providers enabled by the Internet? The ASP (application service provider) model, which some longtime industry experts feel was ahead of its time, could well experience a serious boost from these developments.
Chris Steins
Feature
May 17, 2004, 12am PDT

In the third edition of our series profiling urban planning, development, and design students from across the country, masters students from the University of Washington, Georgia Institute

Catherine Stineback, Jason Gaines, Michael Boettcher
Blog post
May 12, 2004, 5pm PDT
Thanks to Adam Rogers at Wired for this reference to the Transportation Research Board's participation solicitation for XML Schemas for Exchange of Transportation Data.

XML tells the web browser software about the structure and type of information it's displaying, distinguishing content from format by adding metadata.

We predicted that planning specialties would begin developing their own XML schemas in a 1999 article for APA's Planning magazine, 'X' Marks the Spot
Chris Steins
Blog post
May 11, 2004, 5pm PDT
An article in the Christian Science Monitor looks at the information environmentalism movement in an article titled "E-serenity, now!" [May 10, 2004].

keyboard

"The newest polluters are not chemical manufacturers leaking toxins into the air. Neither are they logging conglomerates clearing ancient forests nor avaricious developers turning wetlands into strip malls. The newest polluters are in your pocket, atop your desk, or clogging your telephone lines with streams of digital effluent."
Abhijeet Chavan
Blog post
May 10, 2004, 9am PDT
Accenture has just released a new e-Government report (May, 2004), e-Government Leadership: High Performance, Maximum Value (PDF, 3MB).

This is the fifth year that Accenture has surveyed international e-Gov efforts, and they report that they have found five overall trends: eGovernment advances are diminishing; eGovernment leaders are reaping tangible savings; Adoption of e-gov remains a challenge; The challenge of integrating e-gov is changing; and Personalization is emerging.
Chris Steins
Feature
May 10, 2004, 12am PDT

In PLANetizen's new interview series, Stefanos Polyzoides, co-founder of the Congress for the New Urbanism and co-principal of the architecture and urbanist firm Moule & Polyzoides, ans

Stefanos Polyzoides
Feature
May 3, 2004, 12am PDT
The American Planning Association and the planning profession as a whole have lost their way. Constant compromise has led to mediocrity. Now it's time to get re-focused.
Konrad Perlman
Feature
April 26, 2004, 12am PDT
While planners strive to enhance the transportation-land use configuration to minimize travel and transportation infrastructure, the seemingly unrelenting movement toward larger-scale businesses and services may be counteracting these initiatives.
Steven E. Polzin, PhD
Blog post
April 21, 2004, 10am PDT
Grist Magazine offers tips for environment-friendly computing.

U.S. consumers are being cheated out of the chance to buy the greenest possible computers, according to the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition and other environmental groups that have joined forces on the Computer TakeBack Campaign.
Abhijeet Chavan
Feature
April 12, 2004, 12am PDT

In the second edition of our series profiling urban planning, development, and design students from across the country, masters students from the University of Southern California, Universi

Robert Lopez, Gideon Berger, Andrew Overbeck
Feature
April 5, 2004, 12am PDT

Though smart growth and new urbanism have different origins, constituencies, and tactics, the leaders of these movements must identify how they complement one another.

Joel S. Hirschhorn
Feature
March 29, 2004, 12am PST

In the first edition of a new series profiling urban planning, development, and design students from across the country, masters students from the University of Maryland, University of Cali

Francis McLaughlin, Kelly Koldus, and Matthew Edmond
Feature
March 22, 2004, 12am PST
Grants dedicated to revitalizing distressed public housing are needed to correct flawed Federal housing policies of the past.
Todd Baylson
Feature
March 16, 2004, 12am PST

While there's no consensus on the precise number of white-collar jobs American companies will outsource to India in the coming years, it seems increasingly clear that millions of middle cla

Seth Brown
Feature
March 10, 2004, 12am PST
From congestion charging to Wal-Mart's impact, PLANetizen editors outline the top 10 planning issues from 2003.
Abhijeet Chavan and Chris Steins
Feature
February 9, 2004, 12am PST
Densification is often promoted as a solution to sprawl, but too much density too quickly can also backfire. Adequately implementing a smart growth strategy involves positive publicity, family-centric environments, and motivated developers.
Martin Laplante
Feature
January 19, 2004, 12am PST

Participants in an Internet email discussion list recently engaged in a heated debate on the impact of libertarian principles on urban planning in the United States.

C. Kenneth Orski
Feature
January 12, 2004, 12am PST

Transportation has become far too important to be steered by people who prefer the existing automobile-dominated system.

Joel S. Hirschhorn
Feature
November 24, 2003, 12am PST

Although Houston is the only major American city with no formal zoning code, the city's land use regulations have historically been nearly as meddlesome, as pro-sprawl, and as anti-pedestri

Michael Lewyn
Feature
November 14, 2003, 12am PST
Urban sprawl's impact on school funding is more of a smart growth issue than is commonly realized.
Jonathan D. Weiss