Technology

February 19, 2009, 6am PST
This piece from <em>NPR</em> looks at the debate over plans to use more than $7 billion from the stimulus plan to expand broadband Internet access in rural areas.
NPR
February 18, 2009, 2pm PST
The Wall St. Journal reviews the latest in smart technology for infrastructure, from vehicle infrastructure integration to smart utility meters.
Wall St. Journal
February 18, 2009, 6am PST
In this op-ed, Michael Andregg touts Personal Rapid Transit over 'financially unsustainable' light rail, which he blames politicians for encouraging.
The Pioneer Press
February 16, 2009, 1pm PST
Nobel laureate and new Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu is interviewed on what it will take to solve the climate change crisis - three major technological improvements plus carbon pricing. While no fan of coal, he acknowledges improvements are needed.
The New York Times
February 9, 2009, 1pm PST
The New York Times reports that the renewable energy industry is hurting badly in this recession. Lack of available credit is the main reason, and while the stimulus bill may help, it will not be the solution.
The New York Times
February 9, 2009, 5am PST
For decades, people have been talking about how driverless cars would make highway traffic a thing of the past. Randal O'Toole asks, where are they?
The Antiplanner
February 8, 2009, 7am PST
In the new version of Google Earth, you can compare aerial imagery from the past with current development on the site.
DigitalUrban
February 6, 2009, 8am PST
DC writer Alec Dubro questions the pursuit of the green car, concluding we should cease its financial support. Though people may prefer the car culture, it would make more sense to pursue a ‘post car future’, citing Portland’s compact neighborhoods.
The Progressive
February 3, 2009, 1pm PST
Brad Templeton, chairman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, hopes that robot-driven cars will become commonplace on our roads in the next decade or two.
Boing Boing
February 3, 2009, 12pm PST
In an effort to improve gas mileage, 400 drivers in Denver participated in an experiment that tracked and reported the bad driving habits -- idling, rapid accelerating and braking -- that waste fuel. Faced with the data, driving habits have changed.
Los Angeles Times
February 3, 2009, 10am PST
A long-help plan to install GPS-ready bus tracking equipment to New York City buses has been pushed off indefinitely.
NY1 News
February 3, 2009, 6am PST
New updates to the online visualization program Google Earth add oceans to the image-based virtual version of the planet.
The New York Times
February 2, 2009, 10am PST
Environmental activists and other organizations are using Google Earth to document environmental damage and to promote their various causes.
Conscious Choice
February 1, 2009, 1pm PST
Mark Gorton, creator of Limewire started developing his GeoServer software in 1999. Recently Portland adopted the software to plan bus routes. Gorton wants to foster a new revolution in participatory planning.
Wired Blogs
January 31, 2009, 9am PST
Transit officials in Eugene, Oregon, have announced plans to install a test route for a magnet-guided bus technology.
The Register-Guard
Feature
January 29, 2009, 5am PST
The Internet is a trove of great ideas about improving cities. Filling blogs and personal websites, the vast majority of ideas out there are little more than that: ideas. New York City's Streetsblog -- now a growing nationwide force -- is transforming the conversation into action.
Mike Lydon
January 27, 2009, 12pm PST
The telecommunications industry is pressuring Congress to add language to upcoming bill that would preempt local zoning authority if they 'take too long' to approve cell phone towers or sites.
Anvil Partners blog
January 26, 2009, 7am PST
The "New American Home" for 2009 debuted last week at the International Builders Symposium in Las Vegas. The 9,000 sq. ft. home features the most recent developments in energy efficiency.
The Ground Floor
Blog post
January 24, 2009, 5pm PST

The military has recently opened a new type of recruitment office known as "The Army Experience Center" in a Philadelphia shopping mall. It's like an arcade, where video games and other interactive technologies provide visitors a glimpse of what it might be like to be in the military. It's a new approach, one that capitalizes on the modern teenager's affection for video games to attract them to the military life. You could call it persuasive, cajoling, or even a thinly-veiled attempt to con kids with flashy games, but, as it provides exactly what its target audience wants, the bottom line is that it's very effective. Why couldn't a city do the same thing?

Nate Berg
January 22, 2009, 11am PST
This editorial suggests three strategies to make the American auto fleet more efficient: renewing the hybrid tax credit program (many credits have been exhausted), pursuing a "cash for clunkers program", and increasing the gas tax to supplement CAFE.
The New York Times