Suburban Growth

May 7, 2019, 7am PDT
The rapid economic growth of North Texas might not translate to economic mobility for many residents if the region can't better connect land use and transportation planning, according to this opinion piece.
The Dallas Morning News
April 24, 2019, 9am PDT
Big trends—a geographic shift back to the suburban and exurban areas and a "silver tsunami"—are apparent in population figures for two Florida locations.
Curbed
August 12, 2018, 1pm PDT
Seattle's suburbs are no longer leading the region in housing construction, even as Seattle's urban core is building more housing than ever.
The Seattle Times
April 7, 2018, 1pm PDT
The Dallas apartment building 'boom' is occurring in places like Frisco, Allen, and McKinney.
Dallas News
October 11, 2017, 10am PDT
Researchers at the University of Nebraska have been working with the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources to develop best practices for predicting and planning for the future water needs of urban developments.
University of Nebraska College of Architecture
September 5, 2017, 5am PDT
The author of the "The Rise of the Creative Class" and the "New Urban Crisis" says cities have had their moment.
The New York Times
July 5, 2017, 1pm PDT
Dallas suburbs continue their development boom. The latest example comes from Frisco.
The Dallas Morning News
June 2, 2017, 6am PDT
The Atlanta metropolitan area is facing an estimated 2.5 million new residents by 2040. Some current residents are surprised at some of the neighborhoods accommodating that growth.
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
May 30, 2017, 1pm PDT
According to this opinion piece, the tales of urbanizing Canada are overblown. "We're a suburban nation," says one of the sources quoted in the article.
The Globe and Mail
March 28, 2017, 11am PDT
Not only are suburbs growing, many of the larger, older cities that had reversed decades of population decline, are now losing population, again. The biggest losers: counties with the greatest population densities.
Governing
March 23, 2017, 1pm PDT
Post-recession population growth in the United States looks a lot like pre-recession growth in the United States. As some have predicted or already noticed: the story of U.S. growth is still suburban.
FiveThirtyEight
July 16, 2016, 9am PDT
That headlining claim is found in a recent research study from Pew Charitable Trust's Philadelphia Research Initiative—more demographic goodies are included.
NewsWorks
May 6, 2016, 1pm PDT
The city of Waukesha asked for more water than the Great Lakes Compact would allow. Commenters remind the city of Waukesha that water for growth was never the goal of the Great Lakes Compact.
Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel
March 25, 2016, 5am PDT
It's almost like the Great Recession and the Great Urban Renaissance never happened, as Americans are moving to the suburbs and the Sunbelt than to the nation's urban areas.
Jed Kolko
June 6, 2015, 7am PDT
Although city growth continues to outpace the suburbs, the nation's three largest cities are experiencing a growth slowdown. Sunbelt cities like Austin and Orlando are picking up the slack.
Brookings
February 24, 2015, 5am PST
In some places in the United States, mostly in Florida, some suburban cities have become the big kids on the block.
Panethos
January 5, 2015, 6am PST
Eliot Brown, commercial real estate reporter for The Wall Street Journal, writes on urban trends largely influenced by firms seeking to attract the brightest young workers with decidedly urban preferences. Mid-size and large cities are prospering.
The Wall Street Journal
July 3, 2014, 7am PDT
Pete Saunders compares the disparate experiences of two Chicago suburbs, Naperville and Joliet, who took different approaches to legacy.
The Corner Side Yard
April 30, 2013, 1pm PDT
Joel Kotkin is on a roll in the past few weeks, making the case that the revival of cities and decline of suburbs is a fraud — but his argument ignores the facts, argues Robert Steuteville.
Better! Cities & Towns
June 26, 2010, 1pm PDT
William Frey of Brookings Institution analyzes census data from 2008-2009 in a WSJ economics blog that unmistakably shows a reduction of growth within suburban parts of metro areas while the cities in metro areas have increased in population.
The Wall Street Journal