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Midwest

October 13, 2020, 10am PDT
India could be on track to overtake the United States in the number of COVID-19 cases. The surge is explained by a sharp and growing urban-rural divide in the ability and willingness to follow public health measures.
The New York Times
October 11, 2020, 7am PDT
Hospitals in parts of Wisconsin are experiencing a medical crisis reminiscent of New York and Arizona—they are running out of beds due to a surge of COVID-19 patients. The outbreak is statewide, showing no relationship with density.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
October 5, 2020, 12pm PDT
The Midwest has been the epicenter of coronavirus since late August, led by North and South Dakota. Masks have the potential to significantly reduce viral transmission, but neither state mandates their use. Will a public health campaign help?
Grand Forks Herald
September 28, 2020, 12pm PDT
A midwestern commuter rail line found a unique, if controversial way to achieve 100 percent mask compliance on its trains: Set aside one car, though preferably not the bike car, for riders who opt to travel maskless.
Streetsblog Chicago
August 27, 2020, 5am PDT
During the pandemic's first phase in March and April, the Northeast was devastated by COVID-19. After Memorial Day, the surge was in the South and West. As cases decrease nationwide, they are now spiking in the Midwest, particularly North Dakota.
The Washington Post
April 20, 2020, 10am PDT
After initially saying that he had total authority on how and when to reopen the economy, Trump handed the responsibility to the 50 governors to make their own decisions and offered guidance in the form of a three-phase plan that relies on testing.
The New York Times
July 1, 2018, 5am PDT
Whether or not U.S. housing is affordable comes down not only to cost but also to wages. Both vary dramatically from city to city.
The Brookings Institute
June 1, 2018, 2pm PDT
FiveThirtyEight explores how planners in the Midwest are trying to get ahead of an intensifying climate.
FiveThirtyEight
March 14, 2018, 12pm PDT
Population trends are often used as a shorthand for a city's economic prowess, but Pete Saunders argues they may be a lagging indicator.
Forbes
August 28, 2017, 10am PDT
One need not be on the Gulf Coast to experience some of the effects of Hurricane Harvey, a category 4 storm that landed near Corpus Christi on Friday night. Gas prices are expected to rise five to ten cents per gallon in some regions, then recede.
USA Today
April 26, 2017, 12pm PDT
Some use the phrase to refer to Midwest towns where black people "aren't welcome after dark." A legacy of racial persecution has left majority-white places where black people feel their outlier status.
Christian Science Monitor
March 28, 2017, 11am PDT
Not only are suburbs growing, many of the larger, older cities that had reversed decades of population decline, are now losing population, again. The biggest losers: counties with the greatest population densities.
Governing
March 9, 2017, 6am PST
In a piece for CityLab, Richey Pipparinen argues that trigger-happy city officials need to slow down their push to demolish homes.
CityLab
March 3, 2017, 7am PST
It's fun to write miracle comeback stories, but the epic of Detroit's resurgence has been exaggerated, according to an article in The Conversation.
The Conversation
February 10, 2016, 9am PST
Fairly or unfairly, Des Moines has a solid reputation as one of the nation's least interesting cities. But unbeknownst to the rest of us, this quiet working town might become the Midwest's answer to Austin, Texas.
Politico
October 30, 2015, 9am PDT
Aaron Renn scours the Internet to find 12 maps that attempt to do the impossible: define the geographic and cultural expanse known as the American Midwest.
The Urbanophile
September 2, 2015, 12pm PDT
Ohio rail advocates received good news from the Federal Railroad Administration: The Buckeye State will be included in an FRA study to expand its now meager service, but support from Republican Gov. John Kasich is unlikely judging from his record.
Dayton Daily News
September 1, 2015, 7am PDT
According to analysts like Aaron Renn, the exodus of educated Millennials from what some perceive to be less-glamorous cities shouldn't signal impending doom. For one thing, brain drain might not be happening at all.
Next City
January 25, 2015, 7am PST
So long 2007. Hello 2014. According to new DOT data, peak driving is no longer in the rear view mirror but ahead of us thanks to cheap gas getting even cheaper, the rebound effect, an improved economy, and warmer weather.
The Detroit News
January 4, 2015, 9am PST
William H. Frey, Brookings Institution demographer, writes on the latest Census Bureau demographic data. California and Texas remain number one and two respectively. New York had 19.7 million residents on July 1, 2014, Florida 19.9 million people.
Brookings