Lead

January 3, 2018, 8am PST
In 2017, the Southern California city no longer had to be concerned about water quantity, but was plagued by issues of water quality.
Voice of San Diego
February 1, 2017, 11am PST
Flint residents are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for damages caused by exposure to lead in the city's drinking supply.
The Detroit News
January 13, 2017, 8am PST
After a scandal exposed widespread lead contamination in Chicago schools, new legislation requires regular lead testing.
Politico
December 22, 2016, 10am PST
A Reuters study of public health data found 3,000 examples in the United States where lead poisoning rates exceed those in Flint, Michigan.
Reuters
December 19, 2016, 6am PST
The Trump Administration's politics could provide a nudge to bring environmentalism back to its roots in social justice.
The Atlantic
Blog post
August 22, 2016, 2pm PDT
An Interview with Sean Montgomery, the inventor of CitizenSpring, an app that collects and maps data about safe drinking water.
Casey Brazeal
August 15, 2016, 8am PDT
There's good but guarded news on drinking water. Lead levels are lower, below the federal action threshold, but residents are advised not to drink it without using filters. A federal state of emergency in effect since January was lifted Sunday.
Michigan Radio
July 28, 2016, 9am PDT
Hurricane Katrina may have devastated much of New Orleans, but in its wake, literally, unexpected good work was done. Clean sediment was deposited over lead-contaminated soil, one reason why lead levels in children decreased.
The Times Picayune
March 28, 2016, 6am PDT
The Flint Water Advisory Task Force, an independent investigative group whose five members were appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, held no punches on the causes of the crisis. Two state agencies and the emergency managers were singled out.
Planetizen
March 18, 2016, 10am PDT
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy sat side-by-side at a Congressional hearing on the lead exposure suffered by citizens of Flint.
The Hill
January 31, 2016, 11am PST
While blame squarely lays with Michigan state officials, agencies, and possibly Gov. Rick Snyder himself, the EPA also played a role by both detecting the cause of the problem but not acting on the reports of improper treatment of river water.
Huffington Post
January 30, 2016, 5am PST
Gov. Rick Snyder (R-Mich.) announced on Wednesday that the state is working to ensuring safe tap water for Flint residents. While there is no schedule to replace the corroded lead pipes, they are being treated to prevent further lead leaching.
Detroit Free Press
January 27, 2016, 10am PST
Learning from the mishaps shown by state regulatory agencies in Michigan, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency wasted no time in beginning a criminal investigation resulting from reports of concentrations of high lead levels in some Ohio homes.
WFMJ-TV
January 26, 2016, 5am PST
The damage caused by Michigan environmental agencies charged with protecting public health extend far beyond Flint. Residents suffering health effects from a huge natural gas leak in Southern California see parallels with the lead poisoning crisis.
The New York Times
January 14, 2016, 7am PST
A case is made that Gov. Rick Snyder's handling of the lead-tainted water in Flint, Michigan is analogous to former President George W. Bush's bungling of the crisis resulting after Hurricane Katrina touched-down on the Gulf coast in August 2005.
MSNBC
January 13, 2015, 8am PST
Waste-to-energy plants, or incinerators, are classified as renewable power plants by the EPA. A controversial Baltimore plant is under construction as well. More common in Europe, they may be catching on stateside due to low recycling rates.
The New York Times
December 28, 2014, 11am PST
Six years after one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history, the EPA adopted a rule to regulate a byproduct of coal power plants. The new regulation puts coal ash in the same category as household garbage, disappointing many activists.
EPA Connect
May 21, 2014, 9am PDT
Leaded gasoline is still sold in Afghanistan, Algeria, Iraq, Myanmar, North Korea, and Yemen. Most think that the brain-damaging additive was banned in the U.S in 1995, but not for 167,000 piston-engined aircraft that use leaded aviation fuel.
Chicago Tribune