Diesel Cars

October 24, 2018, 1pm PDT
It's well known that an electric vehicle is only as clean, from a greenhouse gas perspective, as the electricity it consumes to power it. A new study finds that the electricity used in the manufacturing of car batteries also must be considered.
Bloomberg News
October 4, 2018, 11am PDT
Germany's automotive industry and Chancellor Angela Merkel are increasingly worried about the economic effects of court-sanctioned diesel driving bans to improve air quality, as enacted in Hamburg last May. Four more cities are likely to enact bans.
Bloomberg News
May 4, 2018, 2pm PDT
A survey of recent planning decisions demonstrates that cities are no longer necessarily looking to more and bigger highways to solve their traffic problems.
The New York Times
March 2, 2018, 7am PST
Unlike banning sales of new internal combustion vehicles at a future date, the German court ruling applies to the operation of older, diesel-powered cars in the country's most polluted cities. It's up to the cities, though, to enact the bans.
The New York Times
August 2, 2017, 7am PDT
The biggest obstacle to the adoption of electric vehicles in California, a shortage of charging infrastructure, just became a lot more manageable thanks to $200 million from Volkswagen stemming the from the dieselgate settlement.
Los Angeles Times
May 17, 2017, 11am PDT
While the study stems from research that found Volkswagen diesel cars had used 'defeat devices' to pass emissions tests, the new study points to inadequacies in the tests themselves, resulting in 50 percent higher pollution than testing permits.
The International Council on Clean Transportation
January 13, 2017, 11am PST
Similar violation but new player—Fiat Chrysler, accused by U.S. EPA of willfully violating emissions standards for certain models of diesel Jeeps and Ram pickups. The charge comes a day after DOJ settled civil and criminal suits with Volkswagen.
The New York Times
October 31, 2016, 11am PDT
The record deal between Volkswagen, the federal government, California, and consumers directs $5 billion to states to mitigate air pollution. The remainder will be used to compensate consumers who purchased the tampered diesel cars.
Reuters
February 4, 2016, 10am PST
Volkswagen has already submitted its recall plan for its 2-liter diesel engines—it was rejected by both the EPA and California Air Resources Board. It also needed to submit a recall plan for 3-liter diesel engines to CARB by Feb. 2, which it did.
Bloomberg Business
January 7, 2016, 7am PST
It's easy to focus on the sensational headlines based on the fraud committed by Volkswagen, but doing so masks the deadly and ongoing problems of diesel emissions plaguing the world's densely populated cities.
The New York Times
December 29, 2015, 7am PST
Unusually mild and dry weather in much of Italy has worsened air quality so much that city governments are acting to reduce emissions from one of the chief sources of air pollution by enacting odd-even license restrictions on driving.
The New York Times - Europe
December 21, 2015, 2pm PST
It took an act of the Supreme Court for India to address the incredibly unhealthy levels of particulate matter in New Delhi. New rules are aimed at diesel cars, SUVs, and taxis. In Beijing, pollution triggered a red alert for only the second time.
The New York Times - Asia Pacific
December 12, 2015, 9am PST
Athlyn Cathcart-Keays of The Guardian-Cities chronicles the advancement of the international urban car-free movement as well as auto regulations that focus on air pollution. The most recent city to join the growing list is Oslo, Norway
The Guardian Cities
October 18, 2015, 5am PDT
Two separate New York Times articles examine cars powered by electricity in Norway and diesel fuel in Britain and Western Europe in the wake of Volkswagen's emissions scandal. A critic of the Norway's e-car subsidies subtly ties the two together.
The New York Times
December 16, 2014, 12pm PST
Parisian clean air politics turn out to be something of a class issue, even for a socialist mayor. The plans are seen as penalizing low income Parisians while benefiting elitist city dwellers who dislike traffic, overshadowing public health benefits.
The New York Times