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Study: South Los Angeles Fast Food Ban Didn't Cut the Fat

A fast food ban enacted in 2008 in an effort to curb obesity, diabetes, and other chronic health issues failed to achieve its well-intentioned goals, according to a new study by the RAND Corporation.
March 19, 2015, 12pm PDT | James Brasuell | @CasualBrasuell
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"A Los Angeles ordinance designed to curb obesity in low-income areas by restricting the opening of new fast-food restaurants has failed to reduce fast-food consumption or reduce obesity rates in the targeted neighborhoods," according to a press release announcing a new RAND Corporation study. The study was published online by the journal Social Science & Medicine.

The press release describes the key findings that drive the report's conclusions: "A Los Angeles ordinance designed to curb obesity in low-income areas by restricting the opening of new fast-food restaurants has failed to reduce fast-food consumption or reduce obesity rates in the targeted neighborhoods…"

The press release includes a lot more detail about the study, including one bright spot, from a health perspective: the study found a drop in soft drink consumption, but the drop followed trends in other parts of Los Angeles.

Adrian Florido also reported on the study for KPCC. One conclusion of the study, as explained by Florido, is that "the ban on new fast food restaurants does nothing to increase options for healthier food. Nor does it address another major source of unhealthy food in South L.A.: small convenience stores."

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Published on Thursday, March 19, 2015 in RAND
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