De Blasio Outlines Plan to Eliminate NYC Traffic Deaths

Yesterday, Mayor de Blasio launched “Vision Zero”, a multi-agency effort to eliminate NYC's traffic deaths within a decade. With eleven deaths (seven of them pedestrians) already recorded in the new year, progress can't come soon enough.

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January 16, 2014, 5:00 AM PST

By Jonathan Nettler @nettsj


With traffic deaths in New York City approaching falling homicide rates, Mayor Bill de Blasio is taking concrete steps to fulfill one of the most promising initiatives introduced during the mayoral campaign: “'Vision Zero' - a city with zero fatalities or serious injuries caused by car crashes on the streets of New York." 

“'There is an epidemic of traffic fatalities and it can’t go on,' de Blasio said [at an event outlining the plan on Wednesday], noting that traffic fatalities are the leading cause of injury-related death for NYC children and that the city’s plunging homicide rate — 333 murders last year — is closing in on the number of traffic fatalities, which last year’s preliminary data puts at 286 people," reports Stephen Miller. 

"In tone and substance, today’s announcement marked a notable departure from the days when NYC DOT was the sole city agency taking traffic violence seriously," he adds. "The interagency task force will convene over the next month before releasing a report with 'concrete plans' to carry out de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign promises, namely: Dedicating more NYPD resources to traffic enforcement, improving design and enforcement along 50 dangerous corridors and intersections annually, expanding the number of 20 mph zones, and formulating a legislative agenda that includes securing home rule over traffic enforcement cameras."

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