Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Road Safety

December 1, 2019, 5am PST
Transit ridership in Norfolk, Virginia, has been lagging, and the city hopes that changes to the bus and rail systems will turn things around.
Greater Greater Washington
November 13, 2019, 11am PST
The National Transportation Safety Board has released documents related to the Tempe, Arizona, crash that killed a person, highlighting what went wrong with the driverless technology.
Wired
November 6, 2019, 5am PST
New York City will create green waves by adjusting traffic signals to keep cyclists moving, even when drivers will have to slow down.
The New York Times
October 12, 2019, 5am PDT
The Maryland county is launching a traffic safety program, but much work and many changes are needed to eliminate traffic fatalities.
Greater Greater Washington
September 27, 2019, 11am PDT
Pedestrian deaths are on the rise in the United States, but cities have been slow to implement effective policies and road design measures to change the trend.
Los Angeles Times
August 22, 2019, 7am PDT
Lower speed limits make cities safer, more livable, and, in the long run, more functional.
CityLab
June 3, 2019, 11am PDT
New research from the University of Colorado Denver and the University of New Mexico sheds light on how to make cities safer for cyclists and other road users and refutes some assumptions about bike safety, such as "safety-in-numbers."
CU Denver Today
May 10, 2019, 1pm PDT
Road safety advocates, particularly those who promote walking and biking, have long understood the importance of language, such as using "crash" rather than "accident." Two new media studies shed more light on bias in media coverage of crashes.
Outside Online
October 12, 2018, 12pm PDT
The deadliest transportation accident in recent years has some asking whether more can be done to regulate modified vehicles, including limos.
NPR
January 17, 2018, 2pm PST
Around the world, car crashes are the tenth leading cause of death, and while the United States is spending money on transportation, that money isn't making the roads safer.
Curbed
December 6, 2017, 10am PST
The Trump Administration has been defending the interests of the truck industry against regulations proposed during the Obama Administration.
NPR via KPCC
November 27, 2017, 11am PST
It's not just death from gun violence where the U.S. is an outlier. The New York Times compiled traffic fatality data showing that other developed nations have greatly lower traffic death rates, which wasn't historically the case.
The New York Times
September 12, 2017, 2pm PDT
A study examines whether and why bicyclists break traffic laws to shed light on how rational those laws really are.
The Washington Post
May 25, 2017, 11am PDT
A staple of the California driving experience will soon be a thing of the past.
The Mercury News
April 13, 2017, 2pm PDT
According to a report in The Telegraph, some U.K. cities want to use air pollution as a reason to remove speed bumps, Peter Walker argues this idea is ludicrous.
The Guardian
November 5, 2015, 6am PST
One of the nearly 270 amendments the House is considering in the $325 billion transportation reauthorization bill would allow individual states to allow heavier trucks to use highways. It was decisively defeated in a floor vote on Tuesday.
The Hill
September 14, 2015, 5am PDT
The New South Wales minister for roads has taken a firm position against separate bike lanes. Sydney cycling advocates say his policies will bring the city out of step with its global peers.
The Guardian
August 2, 2015, 9am PDT
Motor vehicle crashes claim over 30,000 lives per year, with related costs in the hundreds of billions. While we sometimes view that frightening statistic as inevitable, there are reasons to reexamine speed limits and how we set them.
Five Thirty Eight
April 24, 2015, 11am PDT
Better safety and multimodal ease are not the only benefits offered by complete streets. According to this report, on the average they pay for themselves and then some.
ASLA The Dirt
March 9, 2015, 5am PDT
A psychological experiment finds that warning signs depicting more movement gain more attention, making drivers navigate more carefully.
The Atlantic