Does Living in a Poor Neighborhood Harm Your Health?

A study conducted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the 1990s found that living in poor neighborhoods can actually hurt your health.

November 19, 2011, 11:00 AM PST

By Anonymous (not verified)


Itir Sonuparlak reads the report:

"Initially an effort to research whether moving impoverished families to more affluent neighborhoods could improve employment and schooling, the study found an interesting relationship between women's physical condition and their surrounding environment.

Ten years after the vouchers were distributed, women in the study gave blood samples and provided their weight. "About 16 percent of the women who moved had diabetes, compared with about 20 percent of women who stayed in public housing," the Associated Press reports. "And about 14 percent of those who left the projects were extremely obese, compared with nearly 18 percent of the other women," concluding that a person's risk of diabetes or extreme obesity dropped by about 20 percent when in a higher-income neighborhood.

The experiment targeted women living in public housing units in neighborhoods where 40 percent or more of the residents were considered poor. "

Thanks to Jeffrey Riecke

Thursday, November 17, 2011 in TheCityFix.com

Brooklyn Redevelopment

Study: Market-Rate Development Filters Into Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing

New research sheds new light on one of the most hotly debated questions in planning and development.

September 15, 2021 - Full Stack Economics

Los Angeles, California

The End of Single-Family Zoning in California

Despite a few high-profile failures, the California State Legislature has approved a steady drumbeat of pro-development reforms that loosen zoning restrictions. The state raised the stakes on its zoning reforms this week.

September 19, 2021 - Office of Governor Gavin Newsom

Rendering of St. John redevelopment site

Austin 'Right to Return' Policy Implemented for the First Time

A North Austin development will be the first approved under the city's new Right to Stay and Right to Return policies, aimed at preventing displacement in gentrifying neighborhoods.

September 16, 2021 - Next City

New Updates on The Edge

HUD's Office of Policy Development and Research

New Case Study Posted on HUD User

HUD's Office of Policy Development and Research

Urban Design for Planners 1: Software Tools

This six-course series explores essential urban design concepts using open source software and equips planners with the tools they need to participate fully in the urban design process.

Hand Drawing Master Plans

This course aims to provide an introduction into Urban Design Sketching focused on how to hand draw master plans using a mix of colored markers.