Housing

August 9, 2017, 8am PDT
Zoning and red tape gets a bad wrap in arguments that blame the housing crisis on a lack of housing supply. Another narrative credits a shortage of construction workers on the lack of housing supply in the country.
The Wall Street Journal
August 8, 2017, 9am PDT
Walkable urban neighborhoods tend to have more expensive housing but cheaper transport. By shifting spending from vehicles to housing a typical household can build a million dollars in additional equity by choosing a Smart Growth location.
Public Square
August 7, 2017, 11am PDT
Coastal cities are taking a no-tolerance approach to RVs on their streets, even as they otherwise strive to mitigate and prevent homelessness.
Pacific Standard
August 5, 2017, 11am PDT
A South Chicago neighborhood will get 20,000 new residential units if a plan goes through.
Chicago Tribune
August 5, 2017, 7am PDT
The housing crisis calls for creative solutions.
Curbed
August 4, 2017, 12pm PDT
A new report from Urbanism Next/SCI takes you through a city’s budget—both revenues and expenditures—and describes the areas that will be affected as AVs become commonplace and e-commerce takes on an even larger role in retail
Urbanism Next
August 4, 2017, 7am PDT
When vacancy rates rise, rents should fall. In New York, reports disagree about how much vacancy rates are about to increase, and whether rents will drop at all.
The Wall Street Journal
August 4, 2017, 5am PDT
According to Next City, a new mapping tool from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition reveals the roots of gentrification in addition to making stark a history of discrimination.
Next City
August 3, 2017, 9am PDT
Wildfires tend to start at the Wildland-Urban Interface: those border zones between cities and the open land surrounding them. Keeping the lid on sprawl, it can be argued, would tame the inferno.
Wired
August 1, 2017, 11am PDT
Detroit and Chicago are Rust Belt cities, and citizens need to understand just how different their situations are from the hot property markets of the coasts, Pete Saunders argues.
Forbes
August 1, 2017, 8am PDT
Dan Walters, one of the most well known and longest tenured journalists and observers of California politics, has penned a scathing critique of Marin County's approach to growth.
CALmatters
August 1, 2017, 6am PDT
Montgomery County's plan for Bethesda calls for height bonuses in return for affordable housing. Residents neighboring the proposed incentive zones have successfully resisted that idea.
Greater Greater Washington
August 1, 2017, 5am PDT
Zillow's chief analytics officer and chief economist offers insight into the company's approach to data, models, and the real estate market.
ZDNet
July 31, 2017, 11am PDT
Richard Florida argues that policies in cities around the world are making it harder on those most in need of housing.
CityLab
July 30, 2017, 9am PDT
The debate about inclusionary zoning persists—with some pro-development saying affordable housing fees and requirements stifle development before it can start. A new tool helps crunch the numbers behind the debate.
Steven Can Plan
July 29, 2017, 9am PDT
The Neighborhood Engagement Initiative funding from developers of Schuylkill Yards in Philadelphia is being called the largest program of its kind in the city.
Curbed Philadelphia
July 27, 2017, 11am PDT
The city of Berkeley has a radical idea for how to build more transitional housing for its sizable homeless population.
East Bay Express
July 27, 2017, 8am PDT
Large investment companies are betting against homeownership—by buying up homes in suburban areas and putting them on the rental market.
The Wall Street Journal
July 26, 2017, 11am PDT
The city of Santa Monica increased in population by 6,500 between 1960 and 2010, while the rest of Los Angeles County grew by 60 percent over the same period. A debate over a new downtown plan that includes more housing was never going to be simple.
Los Angeles Times
July 25, 2017, 11am PDT
The argument in the headline, put more specifically: inclusionary zoning, fees, legal challenges, and minimum apartment sizes are counter-productive. The only policy that will add housing stock, is to make it much cheaper to add housing stock.
Sightline Institute