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Urban Heat Island

4 days ago
A new study drives home the need for heat reduction measures in areas populated by lower-income residents.
CityBeat
September 16, 2020, 11am PDT
State climatologists are highly confident that heat waves are likely to trend upwards in future summers in Minnesota. To address extreme heat, researchers are identifying the factors that exacerbate extreme heat.
PlanIt - Metropolitan Council
March 12, 2020, 12pm PDT
The effect of development codes can be felt in the urban tree canopies. Louisville is updating its code to stem the loss of 56,000 trees a year in the city.
WFPL
January 21, 2020, 9am PST
The people living in urban heat islands are much more likely to be inhabited by low-income people of color, and the roots of the environmental justice issue can be found in planning history.
The Oregonian
Blog post
December 4, 2019, 2pm PST
Brian Stone of the Georgia Institute of Technology writes about a recent article he co-authored in the Journal of Planning Education and Research.
JPER
October 1, 2019, 8am PDT
Streets LA General Manager Adel Hagekhalil lays out his priorities and plans for transforming Los Angeles into a system of world-class streets.
The Planning Report
September 7, 2019, 7am PDT
A recently published report finds more evidence to elevate heat as a matter of environmental justice.
NPR
January 2, 2019, 2pm PST
Dallas's resiliency plan analyzed the best ways to combat heat in every neighborhood.
Governing Magazine
December 4, 2017, 11am PST
Faced with a costly urban heat island effect, Louisville is working on a new tree-protection ordinance that could be headed for a vote this week.
Courier-Journal
August 11, 2017, 6am PDT
New research published in Applied Geography is a first step toward planning for the resilience of vulnerable populations as the heat rises in urban areas.
Scientific American
June 4, 2017, 11am PDT
Blame it on the urban heat island effect.
KPCC
May 5, 2017, 7am PDT
Can a few splashes of water on hot pavement reduce the heat island effect? Researchers find evidence to support a traditional Japanese method of cooling the environment.
The Poetry of Science
April 25, 2016, 2pm PDT
Louisville has the ignominious distinction of having the largest heat island effect of any of the largest cities in the United States. A new study from the Urban Climate Lab at Georgia Tech suggests ideas for lowering the heat in the city.
The Courier-Journal
February 1, 2016, 12pm PST
Louisville, Kentucky has recently been named the "most rapidly growing urban heat island" in the U.S., but what led to this title? Jeff Byles traces how cities are becoming increasingly warm through a number of different factors, including economic.
Doggerel
September 24, 2015, 12pm PDT
No, this is not a trick question. By definition, you'd think the answer is L.A., where the heat is generated, but it's actually San Bernardino, 56 miles to the east. Turns out that like ozone, heat is transported by the wind.
KPCC
August 2, 2015, 1pm PDT
Yet another climate change side effect: more frequent urban heat waves. And because urban temperatures tend higher than rural ones, cities should be ready to protect the most vulnerable.
The Nature Conservancy - Cool Green Science
August 9, 2014, 11am PDT
An article by Steven Snell summarizes the drawbacks of building vertical cities.
Fast Forward Weekly
August 1, 2014, 11am PDT
An overview of how Los Angeles County’s Department of Parks and Recreation is creating projects that tackle the effects of climate change, by planner Clement Lau.
UrbDeZine
July 23, 2014, 9am PDT
A study investigates the effect of air conditioning systems on air temperature and electricity demand. The study's findings: the release of waste heat (via AC systems) exacerbates the nocturnal urban heat island, thus increasing cooling demands.
Treehugger
August 14, 2013, 1pm PDT
A new report by state scientists identifies three dozen environmental indicators that confirm the effects of climate change on California are ‘significant and growing.’
Los Angeles Times