Transportation Legislation

June 17, 2019, 6am PDT
The state needs to pass legislation to legalize electric bikes and scooters to give residents more mobility options and discourage driving.
Crain's New York Business
January 19, 2019, 7am PST
Sen. Scott Wiener introduced legislation to make state highways that run through villages, town, and cities, often acting as main streets, accommodate the safety needs of walkers, cyclists, and transit users when undergoing capital improvements.
Streetsblog California
September 26, 2018, 11am PDT
Neighborhood electric vehicles may become more popular in California's second most populous county thanks to legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown. The small zero-emission vehicles are prohibited from crossing streets with speed limits above 35 mph.
KPBS
September 21, 2018, 2pm PDT
The good news: the Clean Air Vehicle program for electric vehicles will be extended for at least three years. The bad news: not all EVs that have a decal now will be able to be renewed. Congestion on HOV and HOT lanes is a major concern.
Los Angeles Times
September 7, 2018, 11am PDT
Transit, affordable housing, TODs, active transportation and local governments should all come out ahead should Brown sign SB 961. The bill follows in the path of earlier legislation that created enhanced infrastructure finance districts.
Move LA
September 4, 2018, 11am PDT
A bill that would toss the helmet requirement for adult e- scooter riders and allow them to ride on roads where the speed limit is 35 mph, up from the current limit of 25 mph, is on Governor Jerry Brown's desk. He has until Sept. 30 to decide.
San Francisco Chronicle
March 16, 2018, 1pm PDT
Importantly, the Washington State Legislature also left a few bills on the cutting room floor.
The Urbanist
March 14, 2018, 8am PDT
Four cities could charge tolls for drivers to enter congested parts of their cities if an assembly bill introduced by Richard Bloom last month becomes law.
San Francisco Examiner
January 5, 2018, 12pm PST
Two bills target hybrid and electric vehicles and even fuel efficient vehicles with new registration fees to increase road funding, as nine states did last year. However, many of those states also hiked gas taxes in the same legislation.
New Hampshire Public Radio
June 26, 2017, 9am PDT
The oldest commuter rail line west of the Mississippi is also unique in another way—it lacks a dedicated source of operating revenue. Legislation has been introduced to allow Peninsula counties to vote to increase sales taxes by 0.125 percent.
The Daily Journal
March 24, 2017, 9am PDT
A bill to ask voters in November to increase the state sales tax by 0.62 percent to fund transportation projects passed its first House committee March 22 on a partisan vote, with Democrats in support and Republican opposed.
The Colorado Independent
April 27, 2011, 12pm PDT
States and local governments across the U.S. are adopting strong complete streets policies, reports the National Complete Streets Coalition. The new report rates written policies on the strength of their inclusion of a list of policies.
Switchboard Blog
July 25, 2009, 11am PDT
The federal transportation bill seems unlikely to pass any time soon, according to legislators. They have yet to reach any consensus about the mechanisms for funding the bill.
The Wall Street Journal
May 15, 2009, 8am PDT
Legislation is being introduced in Congress to guide the course of the next five years of federal transportation spending, focusing on reducing per capita vehicle miles traveled and decreasing truck freight shipping.
The Washington Post
January 25, 2009, 5am PST
This piece from <em>Bloomberg</em> architecture critic James Russell calls for a unified approach to building the nation's transportation infrastructure.
Bloomberg
January 22, 2009, 1pm PST
In Oregon, transportation officials are set to vote on an ambitious list of transportation projects that they hope will garner funding when Congress allocates transportation money this year.
The Oregonian
December 8, 2008, 9am PST
<em>National Journal Magazine</em> has asked it's team of political insiders/bloggers to give their thoughts on how the next federal transportation bill should be written.
National Journal
Blog post
October 1, 2007, 6pm PDT

To paraphrase the New York Times' summation of the Anaheim Angels' rhetorical exodus to Los Angeles a few years ago: some ideas are so stupid that you just have to stand back and watch. To that I would add, some things are so stupid that they deserve derision no matter how long ago they occured. Though it crawled out from the Senate floor in the summer of 2005, SAFETEA-LU -- the $240 billion federal transportation bill -- has, for the past two years, gotten off way too easy.

Josh Stephens