Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Oslo

June 3, 2019, 12pm PDT
Copenhagen may have already met its bicycling goal of 50 percent of modal share for commuting, but it needs to improve the share for all trips. With less funding available, the city is pursuing low cost strategies, such as auto parking removal.
Forbes
April 11, 2019, 5am PDT
Amsterdam will pursue the Oslo model of targeting parking spots, rather than driving bans, to make for a walk-and-bike friendly city. On-street parking spaces will gradually be replaced, starting July 1, with bike lanes, sidewalks, and trees.
CityLab
January 28, 2019, 6am PST
"Parking spots are now bike lanes, transit is fast and easy, and the streets (and local businesses) are full of people."
Fast Company
December 30, 2018, 7am PST
While Trump wants to end the EV credit program, in part to punish GM for closing unprofitable car manufacturing plants, Norway is scaling back the generous perks that have enabled EV sales to comprise almost half on new auto sales.
CityLab
December 25, 2018, 1pm PST
New measures will greatly reduce vehicle traffic in the city center as Oslo moves to put pedestrians, cyclists, and air quality before cars.
The New York Times
December 21, 2018, 7am PST
Many streets and cities are designed for vehicles instead of for pedestrians. But policies and programs in cities around the world, and even in the United States, might be signaling a shift in priorities.
The New York Times
Blog post
October 7, 2018, 7am PDT
As cities swell and car use soars, U.S. cities should take note of some bold, even radical, emissions-reducing policies being deployed around Europe.
Robert Fischer
July 2, 2018, 6am PDT
After failing to implement a car ban, Oslo officials are converting downtown street parking into public space.
Fast Company
June 17, 2017, 5am PDT
Touted as a leader among the European cities moving toward car-free streets, Oslo's ambitions of removing all cars from the city center has hit some roadblocks.
The Guardian
October 17, 2016, 7am PDT
Oslo sets ambitious goal for carbon emissions with a "Climate Budget." The budget is a sign of climate policies to come as the Paris climate agreement begins to take effect around the world.
Next City
September 12, 2016, 5am PDT
For the first time ever, Norway is crowdsourcing public safety information from kids—made possible through the powers of smart phones and gamification.
The Guardian
December 12, 2015, 9am PST
Athlyn Cathcart-Keays of The Guardian-Cities chronicles the advancement of the international urban car-free movement as well as auto regulations that focus on air pollution. The most recent city to join the growing list is Oslo, Norway
The Guardian Cities
Blog post
December 6, 2015, 1pm PST
The line between being pro-pedestrian versus being anti-car can be hard to distinguish, at times. A new experiment to ban cars from the inner city of Oslo, Norway, however, could reveal more about the distinction.
Erling Fossen
June 18, 2012, 10am PDT
Oslo's once-homogenous population has changed dramatically in the past few decades: immigrants and their descendants are predicted to account for 50% of all residents by 2030. Sarah Wesseler looks at the spatial implications of this transition.
Satellite Magazine
March 21, 2012, 10am PDT
In a piece for GE's <em>Ecomagination</em>, Michael d'Estries takes a look at five cities that set the bar for cutting carbon, recycling waste, and making space for Mother Nature.
Ecomagination
September 10, 2011, 7am PDT
Taking full advantage of residential density in Norway's capital, director André Chocron turns Cold Mailman's hit single "Time is the Essence" into a fantastic audiovisual experience.
ArchDaily
Blog post
May 24, 2010, 9am PDT
Scandinavian countries are often praised for the forward-looking planning practices associated with social democracy. Urban planning there includes lots of enviable features, but a tour of a high-profile project outside Oslo, Norway was a reminder that even an urbanist’s paradise includes political fights, squabbles among interests, and embarrassing delays familiar anywhere else. Progressive politics encourage progressive plans, but the process and pitfalls remain the same.
Greg Smithsimon