Transit Agencies Adjusting to New Realities

As transit ridership remains tepid around the country, transit agencies are looking to diversify their funding sources and become less reliant on farebox revenue.

1 minute read

June 21, 2022, 7:00 AM PDT

By Diana Ionescu @aworkoffiction


Farebox

Oran Viriyincy / Flickr

While transit agencies are bending over backwards to bring back passengers, they may have to accept that the post-pandemic future could mean fewer daily riders, writes Skylar Woodhouse in Bloomberg. Despite numerous efforts to reduce or eliminate fares, ridership continues to lag in most cities.

Jim Aloisi, a professor in transportation policy and planning at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says “The problem is structural and it has to do with how agencies have relied too heavily on fare revenue.” According to Woodhouse, “Unless the government steps in or new sources of revenue are found, many agencies may be left with two choices. They can either cut service or raise fares, neither of which will help to bring riders back.” Bob Powers, head of Bay Area Rapid Transit, is calling for his agency to “to be funded more like an essential service, with less reliance on fare revenue.”

As Woodhouse notes, “The outlook appears grim but not all transit authorities are prepared to accept current ridership levels as permanent, especially with rising gas prices and increasing focus on sustainable transportation modes.”

“Nationwide, a key part in boosting ridership will be to increase service and eliminate delays,” but doing so will require new sources of funding and a model less heavily reliant on ridership revenue.

Thursday, June 16, 2022 in Bloomberg

Aerial view of homes on beach in Maui, Hawaii

Hawaii Passes First Legislation Regulating Short-Term Rentals Statewide

The new law will give counties the power to limit number or short-term rentals and convert existing short-term rental units back into long-term residential housing.

May 13, 2024 - USA Today

Aerial view of Oceanwide Plaza skyscrapers covered with graffiti tags.

LA’s Abandoned Towers Loom as a “$1.2 Billion Ruin of Global Capital”

Oceanwide Plaza, shuttered mid-construction after its developer filed for bankruptcy, has stood vacant on prime Los Angeles real estate since 2019.

May 21, 2024 - The Architect's Newspaper

Entrance to a drive-through car wash at night with green 'Enter' sign.

Ohio Towns Move to Ban New Car Washes

City officials in northeast Ohio are putting limits on how many car wash facilities can open in their towns.

May 16, 2024 - News 5 Cleveland

Clpse=up of Uber and Lyft stickers inside a car windshield.

Minnesota Lawmakers Reach Ride Share Compromise

A law awaiting the governor’s signature establishes wage rates for drivers. Ride share companies say if the law passes, they plan to continue service in the state.

8 minutes ago - Minnesota House of Representatives

Green and silver CTfastrak bus at a station in Elmwood, Connecticut.

Connecticut Bus System Earns Top Ranking

Hartford’s CTfastrak system wins out over other US bus networks for service quality and connectivity.

1 hour ago - CT Insider

Aerial view of Oceanwide Plaza skyscrapers covered with graffiti tags.

LA’s Abandoned Towers Loom as a “$1.2 Billion Ruin of Global Capital”

Oceanwide Plaza, shuttered mid-construction after its developer filed for bankruptcy, has stood vacant on prime Los Angeles real estate since 2019.

May 21 - The Architect's Newspaper

News from HUD User

HUD's Office of Policy Development and Research

Call for Speakers

Mpact Transit + Community

New Updates on PD&R Edge

HUD's Office of Policy Development and Research

Urban Design for Planners 1: Software Tools

This six-course series explores essential urban design concepts using open source software and equips planners with the tools they need to participate fully in the urban design process.

Planning for Universal Design

Learn the tools for implementing Universal Design in planning regulations.