All New Commercial Developments Require Porous Pavement in New Orleans

After the challenges of a rainy season with persistent flooding last year, New Orleans is ensuring that the future of its development is more stormwater friendly than its past.

Read Time: 1 minute

September 13, 2019, 7:00 AM PDT

By James Brasuell @CasualBrasuell


Mississippi River

pisaphotograph / Shutterstock

"Now, joining a movement that supporters say will help mitigate flooding and soil subsidence, the City Council has decided that all new commercial parking surfaces in New Orleans must be porous," reports Jessica Williams.

"The rules unanimously approved by the council last week require businesses to use pervious paving — which lets rainwater flow through it, to be absorbed by the soil beneath it — for any new projects," adds Williams. "The rules do not require businesses to replace existing concrete lots and do not affect residential construction."

The new development standards are intended to reduce the flow of stormwater, after a particularly wet rainy season last year. More details are included in the source article.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 in NOLA.com

Chicago Commute

The Right to Mobility

As we consider how to decarbonize transportation, preserving mobility, especially for lower- and middle-income people, must be a priority.

January 26, 2023 - Angie Schmitt

Aerial view of Bend, Oregon with river and old mill district

Bend Eliminates Parking Minimums

The city is complying with an Oregon state mandate that some cities have challenged in court.

January 20, 2023 - KTVZ

Aerial view of dense single-family homes in neighborhood still under construction

How Virginia Counties Use Zoning to Stifle Development

Some state legislators are proposing action at the state level as counties block development using zoning and development requirements even as housing prices rise sharply in the region.

January 23, 2023 - The Virginia Mercury

Concrete building wth Department of Housing and Urban Development sign

How Federal Policy Can Support More Affordable Housing in Exclusionary Communities

The recently funded “Yes In My Back Yard” federal grant program provides support for local and state governments to implement housing policy reforms, but it doesn’t go far enough to undo the exclusionary practices of wealthy communities.

6 minutes ago - Urban Institute

Two buses pull up to a station on a snowy day.

Increased Service, Employer Tax Breaks Entice Transit Ridership in Montgomery County

Montgomery County, Maryland transit planners are hoping workers returning to the office in 2023 will rediscover the benefits of a public transit commute.

1 hour ago - Bethesda Magazine

New York City skyline with construction cranes in foreground

NYC Mayor Adams Proposes Ambitious Housing Agenda in State of the City Address

Housing is one of four “pillars” proposed by Mayor Eric Adams in his “Working People’s Agenda.”

2 hours ago - NYC Office of the Mayor