History / Preservation

February 7, 2016, 5am PST
So the Super Bowl is actually being hosted down the road in Santa Clara, but San Francisco has been Super Bowl City all week. Luckily a feature by The Guardian offers a chance to compare The City's history with its present.
The Guardian
February 5, 2016, 2pm PST
The former locations of nuclear missile sites are more mundane than you probably realize. Geoff Manaugh explores satellite images of Los Angeles, and other cities, for examples.
Travel + Leisure
January 20, 2016, 10am PST
This past April, the Landmarks Law turned 50. Its legacy and impact has been inconsequential for shaping the urban environment.
Thriving Cities Blog
Blog post
January 12, 2016, 2pm PST
Water has been an integral part of the designed landscape for centuries, but is it time to reevaluate its relevance?
Mark Hough
January 10, 2016, 5am PST
There is hidden economic diversity even in one of the most famous (and toniest) of zip codes.
Shelterforce/Rooflines
January 3, 2016, 7am PST
The Wyvernwood Garden Apartments, a large-scale low-rise development opened in 1939, are at the center of a preservation debate. Lauren Walser gives us the case for keeping them.
National Trust For Historic Preservation
December 28, 2015, 5am PST
An important source of housing affordable to wide ranges of incomes has a new, well-funded ally in Philadelphia—the Healthy Rowhouse Project is hoping to make a big impact in 2016.
PlanPhilly
December 25, 2015, 11am PST
A little Christmas Day diversion for those who never stop thinking about cities.
Urban Scratchoff
December 25, 2015, 9am PST
Dancehalls—places for small-town Texans to gather for community—are struggling to survive in a changing Texas.
The Dallas Morning News
December 18, 2015, 9am PST
Journalist Alex Ulam speaks with Sarene Marshall, director of the Urban Land Institute's Center for Sustainability, about the role conservation is playing in fighting climate change and her role at the agency.
Doggerel
Feature
December 18, 2015, 5am PST
The results of a year's worth of writing, reading, sharing, and commenting are in. These are the most popular Planetizen posts from the year 2015.
James Brasuell
December 11, 2015, 6am PST
Created with input from historian Mark Footer, this tool overlays street views of modern Hong Kong with historical photos from the colonial era through the 20th century.
HotelClub
December 9, 2015, 11am PST
Looking for the perfect holiday gift for a planner? Check out these new map books.
New York Times
December 7, 2015, 5am PST
The passage of the five-year FAST Act, the first long-term transportation bill since 2005, solidifies the trend that has been in place since 2008, when General Fund transfers to the Highway Trust Fund first began. Such transfers are now the new norm.
the transport politic
December 6, 2015, 9am PST
Known for its unique Moorish Revival architecture, and beset by a host of urban problems, the Miami suburb may have found its savior in Germane Barnes. The young architect and planner aims to revitalize the area without gentrifying it.
Curbed
December 1, 2015, 12pm PST
We've known for some time that it would be difficult to rein in the automobile once the country's obsession had taken hold. Footage from a news special aired in 1965 offers historic perspective.
nextSTL
November 30, 2015, 11am PST
World leaders are meeting in Paris this week for the United Nation's COP21 talks. But what exactly are the main topics of discussion?
Doggerel
November 24, 2015, 8am PST
Adam Rogers chronicles Los Angeles' long and intimate relationship with the electric light. The city's recent choice to adopt LED streetlights has transformed a classic nighttime into something new.
BOOM: A Journal of California
November 23, 2015, 7am PST
Carl Davis of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy wants a gas tax increase, not gimmicks, to fund the 6-year transportation bill. Not likely. As bad as they are, they are better than resorting to a repatriation tax, notes the press release.
Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
November 13, 2015, 7am PST
The Palo Alto city council has approved one neighborhood's request to prevent the construction of two-story homes.
Palo Alto Weekly