China

March 20, 2012, 8am PDT
Malcolm Moore reports on Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco City, the world's largest eco-city, where residents will be guinea pigs as planners experiment with the city around them.
The Telegraph
March 19, 2012, 11am PDT
China's unrelenting building boom has proven an irresistible lure for hordes of architects from around the world whose jobs disappeared during the Great Recession, reports Brook Larmer.
The New York Times
March 18, 2012, 1pm PDT
Peter Day visits Ordos, a largely empty new city in Inner Mongolia, and sees evidence that the great Chinese building boom, which did so much to fuel the country's astonishing economic growth, is over.
BBC News
March 16, 2012, 12pm PDT
Eric Jaffe looks at the findings of a recent article in the medical journal The Lancet, which predicts massive public health challenges in China resulting from the country's urban influx of migrant workers.
The Atlantic Cities
March 9, 2012, 10am PST
Jonathan Kaiman takes a look at a new hotel in China's Hunan Province that's pushing the envelope of how quickly high-rise buildings can be constructed – and raising eyebrows, and safety concerns, in the process.
Los Angeles Times
March 9, 2012, 9am PST
Shriya Malhotra explores the potential for participatory mapping to manage the complexities of cities in the 21st century.
The City Fix
March 3, 2012, 9am PST
There's no doubt that the awarding of the Pritzker Prize this week to Chinese architect Wang Shu was based as much on its symbolism as for personal achievement. Jiayang Fan looks at what the announcement's reception in China has been.
The New Yorker
March 1, 2012, 10am PST
A current cause for citizen activism in China is the lack of public restrooms for women, writes Sharon LaFraniere. Recent efforts to stage "Occupy Men's Toilets" campaigns in multiple cities have garnered attention from the press, and authorities.
The New York Times
March 1, 2012, 8am PST
According to Nate Berg, they're not to be found in the country's new megacities. In an article for The Atlantic Cities, Berg discusses a recent paper analyzing the outdated law preventing China's growth and prosperity from trickling down.
The Atlantic Cities
February 28, 2012, 6am PST
On Monday it was announced that the most prestigious annual award in architecture has gone to Wang Shu, a 48-year-old Chinese architect with a "relatively low profile" who has yet to design a building outside of China, writes Christopher Hawthorne.
Los Angeles Times
February 16, 2012, 1pm PST
Manish Bapna outlines the factors that put China on the frontlines of sustainable urban development.
Forbes
February 13, 2012, 11am PST
A new report by one of China's premier academic research organizations has warned about rising discrepancies between the growth of China's cities and their ability to provide the resources necessary to serve those populations.
China Daily
February 6, 2012, 6am PST
In a cruel twist, a historic house associated with Chinese architects who championed the notion that 'a great nation should hold dear its historic patrimony', and deemed by authorities an 'immovable cultural relic,' was recently demolished.
The New York Times
January 17, 2012, 1pm PST
On Tuesday, China's National Bureau of Statistics announced that China has, for the first time ever, more urban than rural dwellers.
The Telegraph
January 13, 2012, 12pm PST
Super-fast, beautifully-designed trains are the all the rage again in China, but safety, pricing, and technology concerns now need to be bumped to country's rail priority list to make it work.
The Economist
January 3, 2012, 5am PST
To the ire of environmental critics, the Chinese State Council has moved some bureaucratic roadblocks to likely enable the building of a $3.8 billion dam.
The New York Times
December 24, 2011, 1pm PST
Tom Miller, author of "Urban Billion," discusses the pitfalls and shortcomings of a too-quickly urbanizing Beijing in this interview with David Pierson.
Los Angeles Times
December 16, 2011, 11am PST
Once billed as China's answer to Disneyland, the now-rusting ruins of Wonderland attest to the unsustainability of China's development industry.
yahoo! Finance
November 25, 2011, 7am PST
With parts of its roof being blown off by strong wind, one architect has defended his work on Beijing's newest airport, blaming poor building material choices rather than the overall design.
The Boston Globe
November 16, 2011, 1pm PST
They're about to try it in Ulan Bator, Mongolia, creating giant "naleds" of ice that would melt slowly due to the extreme cold preserved inside.
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