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Volkswagen

July 1, 2016, 5am PDT
It will only take us two-and-a-half minutes to catch you up on the big planning news from the last week of June.
Planetizen
June 29, 2016, 11am PDT
It's been less than a year since Volkswagen got caught installing software on cars to cheat emissions testing. Today the company settled out of court—paying the bulk of a $16 billion settlement to vehicle owners.
KPCC
March 11, 2016, 7am PST
Those Volkswagen cars fitted with the cheat device are a health hazard to city residents. Actually all diesel vehicles are. But the fact that those cars are effectively polluting over 40 times the legal limit means we should take immediate action
Cities of the Future
February 4, 2016, 10am PST
Volkswagen has already submitted its recall plan for its 2-liter diesel engines—it was rejected by both the EPA and California Air Resources Board. It also needed to submit a recall plan for 3-liter diesel engines to CARB by Feb. 2, which it did.
Bloomberg Business
January 7, 2016, 12pm PST
Several key factors, not the least of which was cheap gas, combined to make 2015 a record year for new passenger vehicle sales, smashing the 2009 record of 10.4 million sales and edging-out the prior record of 17.40 million sales in 2000.
The Washington Post
January 7, 2016, 7am PST
It's easy to focus on the sensational headlines based on the fraud committed by Volkswagen, but doing so masks the deadly and ongoing problems of diesel emissions plaguing the world's densely populated cities.
The New York Times
January 5, 2016, 12pm PST
A public apology wasn't going to cut it for Volkswagen after the car company was revealed to have cheated on emissions testing.
U.S. Department of Justice
October 18, 2015, 5am PDT
Two separate New York Times articles examine cars powered by electricity in Norway and diesel fuel in Britain and Western Europe in the wake of Volkswagen's emissions scandal. A critic of the Norway's e-car subsidies subtly ties the two together.
The New York Times
September 23, 2015, 11am PDT
A toxic revelation about the use of software to cheat emissions testing, found in 11 million Volkswagen vehicles, has taken down the company's CEO and could cost the company around $7.3 billion.
The New York Times
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