Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Multnomah County

October 8, 2020, 12pm PDT
The Get Moving 2020 transportation plan will face voters in thee Portland, Oregon region in November.
KGW
September 28, 2020, 8am PDT
A heated dispute over a $5 billion Metro transportation funding ballot measure has erupted between climate activists and a group representing Portland's big business interests.
The Portland Mercury
August 6, 2020, 9am PDT
Multnomah County is planning to spend $825 million to replace the Burnside Bridge, which engineers say is unlikely to withstand the force of a large eathquake.
The Oregonian
June 15, 2020, 11am PDT
These two Western states did something that none of the 20 other states in the nation going the wrong way in the pandemic have yet to do: they paused their reopening plans due to rising coronavirus infections and hospitalizations.
Politico
September 23, 2019, 7am PDT
Even a city with a sterling reputation for multi-modal transportation planning isn't making progress in removing carbon emissions from the local economy.
BikePortland
June 3, 2017, 5am PDT
The timing of the announcement of deeply ambitious energy goals by the city of Portland and the county of Multnomah was not coincidental.
The Oregonian
August 1, 2016, 2pm PDT
Car registration statistics from Multnomah County show passenger vehicle ownership is less popular among its growing number of residents. The residents forgoing cars have done themselves a favor in more ways than one.
Bike Portland
February 29, 2016, 10am PST
Low prices and a less frenetic working environment are drawing tech employees to Portland, Oregon. Gentrification may loom, but along with it may come expanded economic opportunities for the city and state.
Bloomberg Business
September 20, 2013, 8am PDT
As a nation, we are driving less, but we are increasingly stuck in traffic. What explains this paradox? Using Portland as an example, where driving peaked in 2004, Joseph Rose attempts to explain with lots of help from transportation experts.
The Oregonian
June 5, 2012, 12pm PDT
In the first part of a series examining the failure of Portland-area fair housing, Brad Schmidt explains how a region that prides itself on its progressive values and openness to diversity is "harboring a form of institutionalized racial inequity."
The Oregonian