Transportation

March 4, 2009, 5am PST
Legislation written by State Senator Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) would require parking reform in the "Donald Shoup" mold in almost every city in California.
Los Angeles Streetsblog
March 3, 2009, 2pm PST
The President and V.P. addressed the Department of Transportation today, stating that the new investment in infrastructure "will create or save 150,000 jobs by the end of next year, most of them in the private sector."
WhiteHouse.gov
March 3, 2009, 6am PST
<em>Forbes</em> has released its list of the most congested cities in America. Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Dallas and Washington D.C. top the list.
Forbes
March 2, 2009, 2pm PST
Six architects, planners, public intellectuals and authors give their differing opinions on Bloomberg's plan to turn Broadway into a pedestrian-only space.
Freakonomics - NY Times Blog
March 2, 2009, 12pm PST
The National Surface Transportation Infrastructure Financing Commission advises Congress that the U.S. is in an infrastructure crisis, and that they must raise the gas excise tax by ten cents now and begin the switch to a VMT fee.
The New York Times: Energy & Environment
March 2, 2009, 7am PST
American Public Transportation Association President William Millar visits <em>Living on Earth</em> to discuss how the stimulus will benefit public transit in the U.S. -- and why it's "the best of times and the worst of times."
Living on Earth
Feature
March 2, 2009, 5am PST
A new design competition is seeking solutions to L.A.'s transportation problems. But the real solution may not have anything to do with transportation at all.
Nate Berg
March 1, 2009, 1pm PST
This commentary from <em>re:place</em> magazine offers tips and insights into how one can ride transit like a pro.
re:place
March 1, 2009, 7am PST
The City of Denver plans to spend more than $15 million over the next decade to purchase real estate near mass transit.
The Denver Post
February 28, 2009, 1pm PST
The Midwest has high hopes on capturing a big chunk of the federal stimulus money directed towards high speed rail projects.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
February 27, 2009, 1pm PST
Edmonton Alberta is planning to go from a "somewhat bike friendly city to a very bike friendly city." But can it afford it during a recession?
CBC
February 27, 2009, 11am PST
Mayor Bloomberg and Janette Sadik-Khan have unveiled plans to turn a large segment of midtown into a pedestrian-only thoroughfare. The bold move is being applauded by livable street advocates across the United States.
Streetsblog
February 27, 2009, 9am PST
Sightline's Clark Williams-Derry looks at low gas prices, a down economy, and vehicle-miles-traveled, noting that the precipitous declines in VMT have halted, and suspects it may plateau.
WorldChanging
February 26, 2009, 2pm PST
Mayor Michael Bloomberg has announced plans to close off parts of Broadway in Manhattan to car traffic. The city will experiment with the closing as early as May, creating a large pedestrian zone near Times Square.
The New York Times
February 26, 2009, 11am PST
The American Trucking Associations is preparing to focus their upcoming annual meeting on advocacy, promoting their agenda on the TEA-21 Transportation Reauthorization bill to Congress and the Obama administration.
Transport Topics Online
February 26, 2009, 9am PST
Transportation reporter Tom Belden of the Philadelphia Daily ponders how and where the $8 billion in stimulus funds allotted to high-speed rail should be spent, referencing a report by the Progressive Policy Institute.
Philadelphia Daily
February 26, 2009, 8am PST
Kent Kammerer asserts that by jumping too quickly on a TOD bandwagon that stresses density, local municipalities may leave out elements of social infrastructure and adequate services--the real driving forces behind successful, walkable areas.
Cross
February 25, 2009, 2pm PST
San Francisco's Market Street is heavily used by buses, cars, cyclists, and pedestrians alike. Officials are studying the potential effect of restricting cars either partially or completely, to make it "great once again."
The San Francisco Chronicle
Blog post
February 25, 2009, 1pm PST

In much of the United States, day-to-day transit service is under assault as never before; state and local treasuries have been depleted by the recession, and the federal stimulus package is unlikely to be helpful because federal dollars are more likely to flow into capital programs (English translation: shiny new railcars) than into preserving existing service (1). Thus, Americans will have the worst of both worlds: billions thrown at transportation while existing bus routes get whittled away.

Michael Lewyn
February 25, 2009, 12pm PST
Funding in the federal stimulus package for high speed rail has been cheered by transit advocates across the country. This opinion piece argues that in addition, funds should be taken away from the auto industry.
The Boston Globe