Road Diets

October 30, 2017, 7am PDT
Local businesses in Beaverton, Oregon hope new walking and biking infrastructure will attract young talent.
Bike Portland
October 6, 2017, 2pm PDT
Traffic safety projects, and with it the city of Los Angeles' Vision Zero and Great Streets initiatives, have been dealt disappointing setbacks in recent months.
Los Angeles Times
September 1, 2017, 8am PDT
Bigger cars and an older population means a growing number of Americans die while crossing the street, and the country is just getting older.
Mother Nature Network
August 4, 2017, 8am PDT
The Los Angeles Times critiques the political culture in Los Angeles. In this case, it's the failure of a road diet project that provoked the criticism, but these lessons apply to the city's bicycle plans and homeless housing plans, too.
Los Angeles Times
June 19, 2017, 12pm PDT
Urbanize.LA has the scoop on the first indications of plans in South L.A. to give more space in the road to bikers.
Urbanize LA
May 9, 2017, 2pm PDT
Denver is in the process of rolling out a transportation experiment to the residents of the region: separating street space for transit and active transportation can serve all users and doesn't have to be the end of the world for drivers either.
The Denver Post
April 4, 2017, 6am PDT
Streetsblog tells the story of how a Toledo resident got involved in complete streets activism in her community.
Streetsblog USA
July 19, 2016, 7am PDT
According to a recent article in Urban Milwaukee, plans for a road diet have preceded a wave of reinvestment in the Walker's Point neighborhood.
Urban Milwaukee
December 2, 2015, 5am PST
Remember the term "transportation alternatives," as in alternatives to motor vehicle transportation? It's not used much anymore, and for good reason. But more modern terms, e.g. road diet, need to be rethought as well, posits Nate Holmes for Medium.
Medium
October 7, 2015, 11am PDT
A new study of the benefits of a bike lane project in Salt Lake City adds to the body of work suggesting that complete streets overhauls are a good investment for both the public and the private sectors.
People for Bikes
October 5, 2015, 6am PDT
Slowing traffic by reducing the width of lanes should not be a one-size fits all approach to reaching Vision Zero.
The Urbanist
October 1, 2015, 10am PDT
Boulder, Colorado may be one of the most bike-friendly cities in the U.S., but that did not stop the City Council on Tuesday night from voting to remove the protected bike lanes on Folsom street and return the road to four lanes of vehicle traffic.
Daily Camera
September 14, 2015, 8am PDT
The group, Fix The City, sued the city on September 9 on its visionary plan that emphasizes transit, biking, and walking, claiming the traffic lane reductions will create more air pollution, imperil public safety, and add to traffic congestion.
Los Angeles Times
September 1, 2015, 11am PDT
Jeff Speck and Spencer Boomhower created a video to illustrate how road diets work.
CityLab
June 12, 2015, 12pm PDT
Following a "Mayors Challenge" for bike safety by Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Transportation recently released a "Road Diets" report, providing a geographical diverse collection of case studies.
Publicola
March 24, 2015, 5am PDT
Greater Greater Washington reports on the developing plans of county and state officials to bring multi-modal capabilities to Tysons, Virginia as part of an ongoing suburban retrofit.
Greater Greater Washington
December 23, 2014, 7am PST
"The city should consider road diets for all streets with excess car capacity, although they're not always politically easy," writes John Greenfield.
Crain's Chicago Business
December 17, 2014, 12pm PST
Mike Hendricks reports on road diet plans for Grand Boulevard in Downtown Kansas City.
The Kansas City Star
September 15, 2014, 6am PDT
Streetsblog's Tanya Snyder, attending the Pro-Walk Pro-Bike Pro-Place conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., reports that Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced a U.S. DOT pedestrian and bike safety initiative.
Streetsblog USA
June 11, 2014, 10am PDT
While pedestrian safety affects all areas, it disproportionately affects cities with large minority populations because they are more likely to walk than whites. Santa Ana, Calif. a majority "minority" city, is taking steps to make walking safer.
Aljazeera America