Lawsuits

3 days ago
The landlord lobby isn't accepting defeat.
The New York Times
June 6, 2019, 2pm PDT
A former engineering professor (i.e., not a planning professor) says he invented the transportation network company first, and that he has the patent to prove it.
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
June 6, 2019, 1pm PDT
The Iowa Supreme Court affirmed a lower court ruling that found that the Iowa Utilities Board was justified in giving the private owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline the use of eminent domain. Climate change was considered in the ruling.
Des Moines Register
May 24, 2019, 7am PDT
A question of whose business is suppressing whose in the city of Chicago was decided by the State Supreme Court.
Chicago Tribune
May 8, 2019, 7am PDT
People who can't vote can still have a say in the processes by which their neighborhoods are planned and developed. An example from New York City illustrates the point.
Next City
May 5, 2019, 1pm PDT
The Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis, Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of Migratory Birds, and Smart Growth Minneapolis sued Minneapolis on environmental grounds after the city approved its landmark Minneapolis 2040 Comprehensive Plan.
Star Tribune
April 29, 2019, 10am PDT
A unanimous ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals on April 22 found that the chalking of tires by parking enforcement officers on public streets is a violation of the Fourth Amendment.
The New York Times
April 16, 2019, 11am PDT
Can freight trains and a scenic shoreline park along San Francisco Bay coexist, or are they incompatible uses? The East Bay Regional Park District voted to remove old rail tracks that BNSF Railway wants to reactivate. A local court may decide.
San Francisco Chronicle
April 10, 2019, 1pm PDT
A total of $4.5 billion in road and transit projects was at stake in a state taxpayer group's lawsuit against a regional ballot measure approved by voters in June 2018.
The Press Democrat
April 7, 2019, 1pm PDT
A lawsuit against San Diego alleges that the City Council approved an ordinance ending parking requirements on transit corridors without performing necessary environmental review.
NBC San Diego
March 27, 2019, 11am PDT
The nation's sole truck-only tolling program survived its first lawsuit after a federal judge dismissed litigation brought by the American Trucking Associations, ruling that the proper venue was state court. ATA believes it is unconstitutional.
Transport Topics
March 6, 2019, 2pm PST
The now-famous children's lawsuit, featured on 60 Minutes last Sunday, was not filed against President Trump—he just inherited it from his predecessor. Both administrations have tried to have the case dismissed.
CBS News: 60 Minutes
February 21, 2019, 6am PST
There are more than a few reasons to think that the Obama Presidential Center won't go the way of the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, which gave up and decamped for Los Angeles.
Chicago Tribune
January 31, 2019, 9am PST
When it comes to housing lawsuits involving the state and new housing laws, Huntington Beach might be ground zero. Over a week before Attorney General Becerra sued the Orange County city at the behest of Gov. Newsom, the city sued the state.
SF Gate
January 30, 2019, 2pm PST
The Central SoMa Plan took more than seven years of planning and debate to approve. A new lawsuit, expected to be just the first of many, threatens to erase all that work.
San Francisco Chronicle
January 30, 2019, 12pm PST
Gov. Gavin Newsom, only weeks into his new office, had warned cities that his office would hold them accountable for failing to meet their housing requirements. On Friday, he directed Attorney General Xavier Bacerra to sue Hungtinton Beach.
San Francisco Chronicle
January 28, 2019, 1pm PST
California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard, which requires fuel producers to reduce the carbon intensity of transportation fuels by at least 10 percent by 2020, has been opposed by corn ethanol producers and the oil industry since its inception in 2011.
Transport Topics
January 20, 2019, 5am PST
New York City's ailing taxi industry is fighting what they call a "suicide surcharge," a new $2.50 fee they will be forced to charge riders below 95th Street in Manhattan. Eight drivers have already taken their lives as their business suffers.
The New York Times
January 13, 2019, 5am PST
A 2018 law required Airbnb to share the names and addresses of hosts in the New York City. A judge ruled that the mandate violates the 4th Amendment.
Daily News
January 4, 2019, 2pm PST
Thanks to two recent New York State court rulings, disposable food and beverage containers will no longer be made from polystyrene in the nation's largest city. The ban was originally proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg in February 2013.
The New York Times