San Francisco Election Results: Airbnb Regulations, Mission Moratorium, Housing Bond

San Francisco voters rejected a moratorium on market rate housing in The Mission (Prop. I) and tighter restrictions on Airbnb (Prop. F), while approving the city's largest-ever housing bond (Prop. H) and a large mixed-use development.

2 minute read

November 4, 2015, 2:00 PM PST

By Irvin Dawid


Tuesday was a major election for San Francisco voters, particularly on housing measures. Presented below are the results, with links to four separate articles from Laura Dudnick of the San Francisco Examiner.

"In a major victory for home-sharing companies like Airbnb, Proposition F, which would have capped nightly stays at 75 per year and allowed The City to fine Airbnb and other hosting websites for listing unregistered rentals appears to have lost,"  write Michael Barba and Laura Dudnick. "Roughly 55 percent of voters said no to the measure, compared to 45 percent who supported it."

The defeat of Prop. F is a significant win for short-term rental companies like Airbnb, which spent millions of dollars in recent weeks and months to dissuade voters from supporting the proposition.

Voters also rejected an 18-month moratorium on market-rate housing in The Mission, and area that is considered 'ground zero' for gentrification perceived to be caused by more affluent technology workers. Prop. I was defeated with 57 percent of the vote. 

"Opponents of the measure argued that a temporary moratorium on building market-rate housing in the Mission would drive up housing costs citywide and would not prevent the displacement of current residents," writes Dudnick.

The third housing measure, "Proposition A, which received 73.5 percent of the vote, authorizes a $310 million housing bond aimed to construct and preserve low- and middle-income homes," writes Dudnick.

Voters also approved Prop. D, a mixed-use development in Mission Bay proposed by the San Francisco Giants "on 28 acres of waterfront property just south of AT&T Park," writes Dudnick.

The Mission Rock project includes 1,500 new rental apartments — 40 percent of which will be offered at below-market-rate — and eight acres of open space, as well as the rehabbing of historic Pier 48 to become the expanded home for Anchor Brewing.

The initiative was required to go before voters because of Proposition B, a measure passed in June 2014 that calls for voter approval of waterfront height-limit increases.

Also on the ballot was the reelection of Mayor Ed Lee, who faced no serious opposition. He won with 57 percent of the votes.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 in San Francisco Examiner

Rendering of electric scooters, electric cars, light rail train, and apartments in background.

Arizona’s ‘Car-Free’ Community Takes Shape

Culdesac Tempe has been welcoming residents since last year.

February 14, 2024 - The Cool Down

Aerial view of New York City architecture with augmented reality visualization, blue digital holograms over buildings and skyscrapers

4 Ways to Use AI in Urban Planning and City Design

With the ability to predict trends, engage citizens, enhance resource allocation, and guide decision-making, artificial intelligence has the potential to serve as planners’ very own multi-tool.

February 20, 2024 - ArchDaily

"It's The Climate" sign over street in Grants Pass, Oregon.

Oregon Town Seeks Funding for Ambitious Resilience Plan

Like other rural communities, Grants Pass is eager to access federal funding aimed at sustainability initiatives, but faces challenges when it comes to meeting grant requirements.

February 18, 2024 - The Daily Yonder

Close-up of bottom half of stroller being pushed onto sidewalk with no curb cut by person in jeans and brown shoes.

How Infrastructure Communicates Values

The presence and quality of sidewalks, curb cuts, and other basic elements of infrastructure can speak to much more than just economic decisions.

February 23 - Strong Towns

Greyhound and Amtrak buses at a temporary bus terminal in San Francisco, California.

Despite High Ridership, Intercity Bus Lines Are Eliminating Stations

Riders on the ‘forgotten stepchild’ of the U.S. transportation system find themselves waiting for buses curbside as Greyhound sells off its real estate in many U.S. cities.

February 23 - Governing

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo Residents Push Back on Proposed Cap Park

State and local officials say the $1 billion project will heal neighborhoods divided by the Kensington Expressway, but community members say the proposed plan will exacerbate already poor air quality in the area.

February 23 - Bloomberg CityLab

Urban Design for Planners 1: Software Tools

This six-course series explores essential urban design concepts using open source software and equips planners with the tools they need to participate fully in the urban design process.

Planning for Universal Design

Learn the tools for implementing Universal Design in planning regulations.