Wildland-Urban Interface

December 20, 2018, 10am PST
Paradise is the largest incorporated city west of the Mississippi River lacking a public sewer system. The town of of 27,000 relies on septic systems, now potentially damaged. Without sewers, multi-family housing construction becomes more difficult.
San Francisco Chronicle
December 13, 2018, 1pm PST
When will California listen to the experts and stop building in fire prone areas? Not today.
Associated Press via KCRA
March 9, 2018, 10am PST
After the worst wildfire season ever, changes to local land use and state insurance rules essentially ensure that the same thing will happen again.
Bloomberg BusinessWeek
January 4, 2018, 11am PST
Two new books chronicle the origin of U.S. policy on wildfire, the damage that policy has done, and why it’s unlikely to change any time soon.
The New York Times
December 22, 2017, 11am PST
With the state of California in the grips of its most destructive year of wildfires ever, policy makers are pondering questions about whether it is appropriate to rebuild in places at high risk of burning again.
Los Angeles Times
December 11, 2017, 9am PST
As the state's worst wildfire season ever refuses to end, an analyst from UCLA considers how land use and building codes determine the location and extent of the damage.
The Conversation
October 12, 2017, 12pm PDT
The fires in Northern California have caused at least 21 deaths, with over 500 people missing in Sonoma County. Wired science editor, Adam Rogers, looks at the problems posed when urban development encroaches wildlands.
Wired
August 3, 2017, 9am PDT
Wildfires tend to start at the Wildland-Urban Interface: those border zones between cities and the open land surrounding them. Keeping the lid on sprawl, it can be argued, would tame the inferno.
Wired
February 9, 2016, 11am PST
New research says land use patterns have increased the costs of wildfire protection, so strategic land use planning would help lower the costs of wildfire protection.
University of Wyoming
October 5, 2015, 8am PDT
A summer of drought and devastating fires has demonstrated the dangers of allowing residential developments to sprawl ever farther into wild, natural environments.
CityLab