Multimodalism

Blog post
July 13, 2017, 5am PDT

An efficient and fair transportation system must serve diverse users. The "Transportation for Everyone" rating system evaluates transport system diversity and, therefore, its ability to serve all community members.

Todd Litman
July 4, 2017, 9am PDT
Facing explosive development interest around its Metro station, the small city of Culver on L.A.’s Westside is taking steps to shape its mobility future.
The Planning Report
September 14, 2015, 5am PDT
The New South Wales minister for roads has taken a firm position against separate bike lanes. Sydney cycling advocates say his policies will bring the city out of step with its global peers.
The Guardian
July 15, 2015, 8am PDT
The Urban Accessibility Explorer is an easy-to-use mapping system that measures the number of activities that can be reached by residents of specified neighborhoods within a given amount of travel time, by a particular mode and time of day.
Metropolitan Chicago Accessibility Explorer
Blog post
June 2, 2015, 6am PDT
Common planning practices create automobile-dependent communities where driving is convenient and other forms of travel are inefficient. It's time to recognize the value of transportation diversity.
Todd Litman
May 19, 2015, 12pm PDT
While bikeshare garners a lot of attention from the white and wealthy, it is a less obvious choice for low-income communities. Difficulties include weather, time constraints, and overall demand for non-auto modes.
Vox
April 24, 2015, 11am PDT
Better safety and multimodal ease are not the only benefits offered by complete streets. According to this report, on the average they pay for themselves and then some.
ASLA The Dirt
October 3, 2014, 5am PDT
Despite plans to create a uniform bike sharing program through the three New Jersey cities of Hoboken, Jersey City, and Weehawken, in the end Jersey City will join the Citi Bikes program while Hoboken and Weehawken partner with Next Bike.
The New York Times
Blog post
November 16, 2011, 11pm PST

An important current policy debate concerns whether the next U.S. federal surface transportation reauthorization should require spending on “enhancements,” which finance projects such as walkways, bike paths, highway landscaping and historic preservation. This issue receives considerable attention, despite the fact that enhancements represent less than 2% of total federal surface transportation expenditures, because it raises questions about future transport priorities, particularly the role of walking and cycling. In other words, should non-motorized modes be considered real transportation.

Todd Litman