Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

McMansions

October 17, 2019, 6am PDT
Should there be an extra fee for property owners who tear down an existing single-family home and replace it with a much larger, more expensive single-family home?
WAMU
September 27, 2019, 12pm PDT
McMansion or not, the American home is a good 600 to 800 square feet larger than the average in most other countries. Possible reasons run the gamut from policy to culture to personal economics.
The Atlantic
August 28, 2019, 9am PDT
Redwood City, located on the San Francisco Peninsula, will make it harder to build homes that take up more than 45 percent of a residential lot.
The Mercury News
June 13, 2019, 9am PDT
A thought experiment compares the carbon impact of three new single family homes with the same block if it contained a duplex, a triplex, and a fourplex.
Sightline Institute
June 12, 2019, 10am PDT
As houses grow and households shrink, many Americans have a lot more space to themselves. But recent research says they aren't any happier trying to keep up with Joneses.
The Atlantic
May 30, 2019, 9am PDT
Is this a two-birds-with-one-stone situation?
The Seattle Times
May 10, 2019, 10am PDT
One benefit of more accessory dwelling units (ADUs) could be less mansionization of oversized single-family homes.
Curbed Seattle
October 11, 2017, 9am PDT
The city of Portland's new residential infill ordinance would reduce the number of 1:1 demolitions—which often convert older, affordable homes into expensive McMansions.
Portland for Everyone
June 27, 2017, 6am PDT
[Updated June 29, 2017] It's been a mixed bag for viral sensation McMansion Hell. The same day as a feature video by The Washington Post, the news broke that the website is facing potential legal charges from real estate site Zillow.
The Verge
May 3, 2017, 12pm PDT
A research study has found that increasing house sizes in the Los Angeles area have drastically reduced the number of trees shading the region's landscapes—regardless of geographic location of socioeconomic status.
EurekAlert
November 3, 2016, 8am PDT
Portland is expecting 123,000 new households in the city by 2035, so it's proposed a new residential infill policy to accommodate all those people. A new report argues, however, that the policy could have a chilling effect on infill development.
Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 21, 2016, 12pm PDT
The city of Portland, Oregon is considering new regulations to limit the kinds of homes that can be built in existing neighborhoods.
Portland for Everyone
September 26, 2016, 9am PDT
With a two-year Interim Development Control Ordinance set to expire in March 2017, Burbank, California is working on new design guidelines for single-family homes.
The Burbank Leader
September 14, 2016, 5am PDT
Recent analysis shows that Americans are less willing to pay extra for large houses. It's information best viewed skeptically, but it's also worth considering why this trend has finally, semmingly swung the other way.
City Observatory
August 16, 2016, 11am PDT
A "McMansion 101" post for those who wish to arm themselves with studied arguments against this popular style of residential construction.
McMansion Hell
July 11, 2016, 8am PDT
Americans have shown a clear preference for larger homes—even at the expense of the coveted backyard.
The Boston Globe
October 9, 2015, 2pm PDT
An editorial favors one local city's approach to mansionization over another's. When will they ever learn?
Pasadena Star-News
August 21, 2015, 6am PDT
Joe Cortright criticizes reports linking high median new home sizes to a renewed demand for McMansions. The market for single-family homes, he argues, locks out buyers of modest means. Only the well-off are buying.
City Observatory City Commentary
June 30, 2015, 8am PDT
Chinese and Indian cities have been quick to welcome housing developments modeled on North American suburbs, including "Orange County" and "Vancouver Forest" in Beijing. This globalized sprawl perpetuates all the ills of our own.
The City Fix
June 8, 2015, 6am PDT
According to this article, the market forces behind large home construction are alive and well. In a process of suburban gentrification, developers purchase older, smaller homes and build "McMansions" in their place.
Bloomberg