Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Kurtis Alexander

October 11, 2019, 8am PDT
A decision by the Bureau of Land Management on Oct. 3 may reverse the outcome of a 2013 lawsuit against the Obama administration by two environmental groups that effectively halted drilling in Fresno, Monterey and San Benito counties.
The Hill
April 28, 2019, 9am PDT
The Bakersfield Office of the Bureau of Land Management released an environmental study that is the basis for undoing a 2013 de facto moratorium on fracking on federal lands in California. The Supplemental EIS triggers a 45-day public comment period.
San Francisco Chronicle
February 21, 2019, 11am PST
The Trump administration has canceled a nearly $1 billion grant assigned to the California high-speed rail project and is attempting to get the state to return the $2.5 billion it has already spent on the $77 billion project.
The New York Times
December 20, 2018, 10am PST
Paradise is the largest incorporated city west of the Mississippi River lacking a public sewer system. The town of of 27,000 relies on septic systems, now potentially damaged. Without sewers, multi-family housing construction becomes more difficult.
San Francisco Chronicle
October 1, 2018, 2pm PDT
The $2.2 billion Salesforce Transit Center, which opened to much celebration on Aug. 11, closed down abruptly Sept. 25 after workers found a cracked steel beam. A second cracked beam was later found. Work began Sunday to shore up the structure.
San Francisco Chronicle
August 30, 2018, 9am PDT
Senate Bill 100 by Sen. Kevin de León has one more hurdle to clear before it becomes law. While the state's greatest climate challenge isn't electricity generation, it will be helpful as more motorists turn toward electric vehicles.
Los Angeles Times
July 25, 2018, 1pm PDT
A New York federal district court rules on a climate change lawsuit like its West Coast counterpart did last month: Don't hold oil companies accountable for climate change and sea level rise. Baltimore and Rhode Island file climate change lawsuits.
Inside Climate News
February 14, 2018, 2pm PST
While there has been no lack of criticism (some might say condemnation) of the $200 billion investment that aims to generate an additional $1.3 trillion, some individuals and groups have stepped forward to praise the plan, or at least parts of it.
DC Velocity
January 8, 2018, 12pm PST
In a major blow to former President Obama's restrictions on offshore drilling in sensitive areas, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced that he would open the Outer Continental Shelf in four regions: Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic, and the Gulf Coast.
The Washington Post
November 27, 2017, 1pm PST
The legislature placed a $4.1 billion water bond on the ballot in June while a privately funded initiative hopes to qualify an $8.9 billion water bond for the November ballot. The state measure would also fund parks and trails.
San Francisco Chronicle
October 21, 2017, 11am PDT
The program is voluntary, providing incentives to replace older, uncertified wood stoves for cleaner replacements or alternatives. In addition to decreasing air pollution, it reduces emissions of a "super climate pollutant," black carbon.
California State Senate
July 25, 2017, 10am PDT
To secure needed votes to pass a vital cap-and-trade bill, Brown made a deal with California's Republican lawmakers that could cost him his legacy infrastructure project—the high-speed train from Los Angeles to San Francisco.
San Francisco Chronicle
July 10, 2017, 10am PDT
Secretary Zinke's order is part of the "energy dominance" agenda of the Trump Administration to make the U.S. a major energy exporter. The order will reduce the time needed by the Bureau of Land Management to process permitting for new wells.
The Washington Post
April 24, 2017, 9am PDT
With the adoption of the "Spare the Air - Cool the Climate" program, the Bay Area's air quality regulatory agency has broadened its mission to make reduction of greenhouse gases a paramount goal, along with protecting public health.
San Francisco Chronicle
December 21, 2016, 10am PST
Fewer babies are being born in the nation's most populous state, now estimated at 39.4 million residents, according to new data by the California Department of Finance. The state grew by .75 percent, adding 295,000 people in the year ending July 1.
San Francisco Chronicle