Special Series: 'The Wal-Mart Effect'

The Los Angeles Times begins a three-part, hard-hitting look at the devastating effects of Wal-Mart's quest for the ultimate low price.
November 25, 2003, 7am PST | Chris Steins | @urbaninsight
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"From its headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., the company has established a network of 10,000 suppliers and constantly pressures them to lower their prices. At the same time, Wal-Mart buyers continually search the globe for still-cheaper sources of supply. The competition pits vendor against vendor, country against country... Wal-Mart's decisions influence wages and working conditions across a wide swath of the world economy, from the shopping centers of Las Vegas to the factories of Honduras and South Asia. Its business is so vital to developing countries that some send emissaries to the corporate headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., almost as if Wal-Mart were a sovereign nation... As Wal-Mart expands rapidly into groceries, it is causing upheaval in yet another corner of the economy. When a Supercenter moves into town, competitors often are wiped out, taking high-paying union jobs with them."

Thanks to Chris Steins

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Published on Monday, November 24, 2003 in The Los Angeles Times
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