History / Preservation

2 days ago
The history of the Chicago Cultural Center, "the nation's first and most comprehensive free municipal cultural venue," offers insight into the shifting relationships between culture, politics, and money in the third-largest city in the United States.
Soft City
Blog post
2 days ago
Today’s "Eco" or "Green" Urbanism movement has ancient, cross-cultural roots. This history is worth contemplating for lessons relevant to sustainable planning and design.
Dean Saitta
3 days ago
A timber company is nearing the end of its deal to log the Port Gamble Forest, so local preservationists are raising money to protect the forest from development.
The Seattle Times
4 days ago
A call to action for Atlanta: some of the city's treasured landmarks could disappear in 2017 if the city doesn't embrace a culture of preservation.
SaportaReport
January 4, 2017, 12pm PST
Along with commute time reductions, expect significant rent increases resulting in some displacement of current residents around the three new Second Avenue Subway stations, according to a new report.
The New York Times - N.Y. / Region
January 2, 2017, 9am PST
Harvard Square in Cambridge is facing another round of developments, and residents are worries the changes could come at the expense of the character of the famous location.
The Boston Globe
January 1, 2017, 5am PST
The National Trust for Historic Preservation's new Atlas for ReUrbanization relies on a metric called "character" to explore the relationship between historic preservation and affordability.
CityLab
Blog post
December 30, 2016, 5am PST
Raleigh, NC has hopes for turning 300 acres of land near its downtown into a beautiful park. Elite landscape architecture firms are eager to help, and selecting the right one for the job won't be easy.
Mark Hough
December 21, 2016, 12pm PST
The long-controversial project that would add a mixed-use development on a long-dormant site in Washington, D.C. has encountered a legal setback in the D.C. Court of Appeals.
DCist
Feature
December 19, 2016, 2pm PST
No Electoral College needed: these were the most popular Planetizen posts from the year 2016.
James Brasuell
Feature
December 7, 2016, 7am PST
Sam Hall Kaplan reviews "Eyes on Street: The Life of Jane Jacobs" and offers insight gained from personal experience with the "Saint of City Planning."
Sam Hall Kaplan
December 1, 2016, 12pm PST
Currently owned by the state of Georgia, Atlanta's Pullman Yard may get a lot harder (but not impossible) to redevelop. Atlanta's Urban Design Commission is considering a proposal to grant protected status to the property.
Saporta Report
November 30, 2016, 12pm PST
Founded in 1928, the fascist new town of Arborea (formerly known as Mussolinia) still shows hints of the divergence between the traditional towns of Sardinia and the modernist leanings of its founders.
Wallpaper
November 18, 2016, 9am PST
For the first time in its 70-year history, the National Trust for Historic Preservation will hold its annual conference in the city of Houston.
The Houston Chronicle
November 15, 2016, 8am PST
Failing to receive protection from the St. Petersburg, Florida city council, a historic downtown block faces an uncertain future.
Creative Loafing Tampa Bay
November 11, 2016, 2pm PST
A planner reflects on one of New Mexico's great planning successes, the Santa Fe Railyard.
Santa Fe New Mexican
November 7, 2016, 9am PST
The new district may be both preservationist and political.
The Architect's Newspaper
November 6, 2016, 1pm PST
In San Diego, a battle is taking place between residents of historic Barrio Logan and proponents of an NFL stadium which threatens it. Actor Mario Lopez has been hired to sell the stadium proposal.
UrbDeZine
October 29, 2016, 9am PDT
A look at Parkchester, one of four planned communities built by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in New York City, circa 1940s. The complex includes over 12,000 rental and ownership apartments, located near the #6 subway.
The New York Times
October 20, 2016, 6am PDT
The Mapping Inequality website documents how the liberal ideals of the New Deal devolved into discrimination and inequality.
National Geographic