Lead Exposure

February 16, 2017, 1pm PST
Cleveland's rental housing stock is a public health risk, and the city is finally taking steps to launch a citywide inspection.
The Cleveland Plain Dealer
February 13, 2017, 7am PST
The end of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may not come from the hands of President Trump or Scott Pruitt, the nominee to head the agency, but from a bill introduced Feb. 3 titled, "To terminate the Environmental Protection Agency."
Fox Business
February 1, 2017, 11am PST
Flint residents are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for damages caused by exposure to lead in the city's drinking supply.
The Detroit News
January 13, 2017, 8am PST
After a scandal exposed widespread lead contamination in Chicago schools, new legislation requires regular lead testing.
Politico
December 22, 2016, 10am PST
A Reuters study of public health data found 3,000 examples in the United States where lead poisoning rates exceed those in Flint, Michigan.
Reuters
September 30, 2016, 12pm PDT
An amendment to the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) that would provide $170 million to replace contaminated water pipes is headed to the 11th hour of the Congressional session.
Detroit Free Press
August 15, 2016, 8am PDT
There's good but guarded news on drinking water. Lead levels are lower, below the federal action threshold, but residents are advised not to drink it without using filters. A federal state of emergency in effect since January was lifted Sunday.
Michigan Radio
July 28, 2016, 9am PDT
Hurricane Katrina may have devastated much of New Orleans, but in its wake, literally, unexpected good work was done. Clean sediment was deposited over lead-contaminated soil, one reason why lead levels in children decreased.
The Times Picayune
July 24, 2016, 1pm PDT
A home in poor physical condition can be "devastating" to a child's early development, a study of Cleveland kindergarteners found.
The Atlantic
May 13, 2016, 7am PDT
A distressing report on the state of the water supply infrastructure in Illinois reveals the need for better analysis and reporting of water quality.
Chicago Tribune
March 28, 2016, 6am PDT
The Flint Water Advisory Task Force, an independent investigative group whose five members were appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, held no punches on the causes of the crisis. Two state agencies and the emergency managers were singled out.
Planetizen
March 18, 2016, 10am PDT
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy sat side-by-side at a Congressional hearing on the lead exposure suffered by citizens of Flint.
The Hill
February 19, 2016, 8am PST
Flint, Michigan is not an anomaly.
TomDispatch
January 31, 2016, 11am PST
While blame squarely lays with Michigan state officials, agencies, and possibly Gov. Rick Snyder himself, the EPA also played a role by both detecting the cause of the problem but not acting on the reports of improper treatment of river water.
Huffington Post
January 30, 2016, 5am PST
Gov. Rick Snyder (R-Mich.) announced on Wednesday that the state is working to ensuring safe tap water for Flint residents. While there is no schedule to replace the corroded lead pipes, they are being treated to prevent further lead leaching.
Detroit Free Press
January 27, 2016, 10am PST
Learning from the mishaps shown by state regulatory agencies in Michigan, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency wasted no time in beginning a criminal investigation resulting from reports of concentrations of high lead levels in some Ohio homes.
WFMJ-TV
January 26, 2016, 5am PST
The damage caused by Michigan environmental agencies charged with protecting public health extend far beyond Flint. Residents suffering health effects from a huge natural gas leak in Southern California see parallels with the lead poisoning crisis.
The New York Times
January 16, 2016, 1pm PST
The Washington Post shows why the Flint water crisis is so concerning for the health of the residents affected.
The Washington Post
January 11, 2013, 12pm PST
For decades, researchers have hunted for an explanation for why big cities have been more prone to violent crime than small ones. A new hypothesis may offer a surprising answer, and prove that big cities aren't inherently much more dangerous.
Mother Jones