Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

South Florida

January 19, 2018, 10am PST
A 51-year-old bicyclist became the second fatality in the first week of revenue service. It was the fourth fatality since the summer for the diesel train, which operates from West Palm Beach to Fort Lauderdale.
Sun Sentinel
September 14, 2017, 5am PDT
A city of almost 92,000 people sits on a one-mile wide island designed by nature to protect the mainland from ocean swells, storms, and hurricanes. The seven-mile long island, which floods even when sunny, was spared from catastrophic storm surge.
Planetizen
September 8, 2017, 2pm PDT
As Irma leaves the Caribbean and heads for Florida, with landfall expected this weekend, there is a lot to worry about: New building codes will be put to test, fuel to evacuate is in short supply, and cranes have not been dismantled.
The New York Times
September 6, 2017, 5am PDT
As Houston and East Texas recover from Hurricane Harvey, an even stronger hurricane has formed in the Atlantic Ocean, headed to the Caribbean Sea, and likely Florida by this weekend, though there is uncertainty where it goes next.
Guardian
March 15, 2017, 10am PDT
Good and bad news for followers of Brightline, a South Florida rail start-up. Service between West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale begins in July, with Miami soon thereafter, but opponents may hamper extension to Orlando.
Palm Beach Post
October 19, 2016, 8am PDT
With tidal flooding on the rise for a decade, the most recent King Tide served as another reminder of the need for South Florida to prepare for rising seas.
Miami Herald
May 26, 2016, 12pm PDT
In South Florida, much of the focus in dealing with seal level rise has been on pumps and property values. A strong case is emerging, however, for the protection of the natural environment of the Everglades.
Capital Public Radio
December 30, 2015, 2pm PST
Miami Beach is drafting its own textbook for how to respond to sea level rise. The New Yorker provides in-depth coverage of a region under siege by the sea that surrounds it.
The New Yorker
November 14, 2013, 9am PST
With much of its highly-developed coastline located just a few feet above sea level, Florida is highly vulnerable to global warming. But you wouldn't know that by the actions (or inaction) of state legislators and business leaders.
The New York Times