American Community Survey

4 days ago
Several cities located in the Northeast, especially in the New York region, saw a significant increase in the number of car-free households.
Governing
4 days ago
New American Community Survey Data reveals the cities where renters are paying the most.
The Seattle Times
October 24, 2017, 5am PDT
Oregon's recently approved gas tax legislation also calls for tolling of I-405 and I-5 in the Portland metro area, with the application of value or congestion pricing so peak period tolls would be higher, which have raised equity concerns.
City Observatory
October 13, 2017, 9am PDT
A Harvard study suggests that since 2000, the number of Americans living in racially integrated neighborhoods has risen. But this may be a temporary effect of gentrification, and integration remains an exception to the rule.
Housing Perspectives
Blog post
October 4, 2017, 2pm PDT

Recently released travel data show Americans returning to their cars as the economic recovery deepens. Alternative forms of transportation are not attracting new users.

Steven Polzin
September 19, 2017, 6am PDT
While the country overall made progress, larger cities are making stronger gains against poverty.
Brookings
September 19, 2017, 5am PDT
Finding the answers to the questions posed by the latest transportation data from the American Community Survey will determine the best use of limited resources for infrastructure investment and planning.
U.S. News & World Report
March 9, 2017, 2pm PST
President Trump has made no secret of his disdain for many of the traditional data points used to represent the health and prosperity of the country. The budgetary process offers an opportunity to match words with action.
Pacific Standard
Blog post
September 28, 2016, 8am PDT
Is commuting Deplorable? Can we Make Commuting Great Again? It is sometimes necessary to resort to hyperbole to draw attention to real data.
Steven Polzin
September 19, 2016, 1pm PDT
The American Community Survey released new data on the who and where of migration.
Medium
May 2, 2016, 7am PDT
A collaboration between Deloitte, Datawheel, and MIT has produced an intuitive aesthetically-pleasing gathering point for public data in the United States. Specific locations and industries boast easy-to-read profiles.
CityLab
March 7, 2016, 9am PST
The Golden State attracts high-end workers, while its high housing costs cause a disproportionate number of low and middle income workers to flee the state. The non-profit think tank, Next 10, delves into this crisis in three new reports.
Next 10
March 4, 2016, 8am PST
Just when boomers are ready to return to the city to enjoy all its cultural offerings, they find themselves priced out. Many do downsize, however, from large single family homes to more urban areas close to home.
The New York Times
January 18, 2016, 6am PST
Canadian researchers made the case at the Transportation Research Board this past week that improved bike infrastructure and neighborhood gentrification go hand in hand. They used research gathered fromi Portland and Chicago.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
December 12, 2015, 1pm PST
It's too soon to declare the beginning of the end for segregation, but one demographer is hopeful that there are opportunities to better integrate different racial groups.
Brookings
October 21, 2015, 6am PDT
Yonah Freemark throws cold water on the notion that the country is becoming less auto-dependent. Yes, millennials are less auto-oriented than older were, but they haven't stopped per-capita vehicle miles traveled from increasing.
the transport politic
August 21, 2015, 2pm PDT
When it comes to the Census, the term "alternative transportation" makes perfect sense. Eric Jaffe looks at the 15 metropolitan areas with the lowest auto commuting and describes the most popular alternatives.
CityLab
August 19, 2015, 12pm PDT
The Wonkblog team puts new American Community Survey data to good use.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
August 18, 2015, 7am PDT
Proof from the Census Bureau's latest American Community Survey on commuting by auto shows that millennials, if they live in cities, do indeed drive less. Census researcher Brian McKenzie describes the finding in the bureau's blog, Random Samplings.
Random Samplings
August 17, 2015, 6am PDT
According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey on commuting to work, one subregion in the Bay Area can claim accolades for having achieved the largest drop in solo-commuting from 2006, scoring the third lowest drive-alone rate in 2013.
The Sacramento Bee - Capitol Alert