The Road to South Africa's World Cup

South Africa is gearing up to host the 2010 World Cup next June. As it prepares to be the tournament's first African host, the country faces a number of hurdles.

Read Time: 1 minute

September 14, 2009, 9:00 AM PDT

By Nate Berg


Progress is fast underway on stadia across the country, and a new stadium in Cape Town is on track for early completion. But despite these gains on tournament-related infrastructure, the country has many social issues to contend with as it prepares to face the global spotlight.

"[T]here is more to South Africa than the relative affluence of the Western Cape and the country's high crime rates worry many potential visitors. Johannesburg looms large in this context with two venues and some of the world's most frightening crime statistics and stories.

The US embassy last year warned that armed gangs were targeting new arrivals at the Oliver Tambo International Airport. Spotters at the arrivals terminal would identify a victim who would then be followed and either robbed at gun-point outside the airport or at their hotel. South African police strongly denied reports of a crime syndicate but some tourists were mugged in the reception areas of upmarket hotels.

Before anyone scraps plans to head south it's worth considering the scale of the security operation that will shield World Cup visitors. More than 41,000 new police officers will have been hired. Security corridors will be set up linking airports to hotels to venues."

Friday, September 11, 2009 in The Independent

Chicago Commute

The Right to Mobility

As we consider how to decarbonize transportation, preserving mobility, especially for lower- and middle-income people, must be a priority.

January 26, 2023 - Angie Schmitt

Sharrow bike markings on black asphalt two-lane road with snowy trees

Early Sharrow Booster: ‘I Was Wrong’

The lane marking was meant to raise awareness and instill shared respect among drivers and cyclists. But their inefficiency has led supporters to denounce sharrows, pushing instead for more robust bike infrastructure that truly protects riders.

January 26, 2023 - Streetsblog USA

View of stone-paved street with pedestrians and "Farmers Market" neon sign on left and old buildings on right in Seattle, Washington

Push and Pull: The Link Between Walkability and Affordability

The increased demand for walkable urban spaces could make them more and more exclusionary if cities don’t pursue policies to limit displacement and boost affordability.

January 27, 2023 - Smart Cities Dive

Aerial view from directly overhead of buses parked in large asphalt lot

U.S. Transit Agencies Face a Financial Crisis

Transit providers around the country are scrambling to find new sources of revenue to replace lagging ridership and reorienting their systems to a future less dependent on daily commuters.

5 hours ago - Smart Cities Dive

Water SUpply

California Rejects Six-State Colorado River Plan, Proposes Its Own

State officials claim a proposal agreed upon by the other six states using Colorado River water disproportionately impacts California farmers.

6 hours ago - Los Angeles Times

Pedestrians in zebra crosswalk with green bike lane in downtown Seattle, Washington with three-story brick building in background

Washington Focuses Road Safety Efforts on Individuals, Neglecting Design

Legislative efforts to reduce traffic deaths could move the needle toward Vision Zero, but state leaders failed to commit infrastructure funds to making structural improvements.

7 hours ago - The Urbanist