Texas Ends Contract With Toll Road Operator

Citing "lackluster service," the department will be seeking a new technology provider.

1 minute read

August 31, 2021, 11:00 AM PDT

By Diana Ionescu @aworkoffiction


Toll Road

Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is ending its contract with its toll road operator, reports R.A. Schuetz, citing "unnecessary challenges" for users and a recent error that resulted in overcharging some drivers.

Marc Williams, TxDOT executive director, said "We take the responsibility of providing a quality and trusted customer experience very seriously, and regret the impact and inconvenience these past many months of lackluster IBM service have had on our toll road users."  

The operator, IBM, disputes the charge, saying in a statement that TxDOT failed to fulfill obligations on its end, and that "[d]espite TxDOT’s failure, IBM’s performance and the system IBM has implemented far exceed operational requirements anticipated when the contract was signed to the benefit of Texas motorists."

The state is now using an "emergency contract" to provide toll services until  a new operator is selected. "TxDOT assured customers that the interim technology providers would make sure that information remained secure and that the billing system would remain accurate, timely and usable. TxTag is not charging late fees during the transition."

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