The '30 by 30' Framework Sets an Ambitious Goal for Nature Conservation

California State Legislature committee approved AB 3030 in May, adopting a plan to save 30% of land and sea from development by the year 2030. The Convention on Biological Diversity is likely to follow in adopting the 30 by 30 framework.

June 1, 2020, 11:00 AM PDT

By Lee Flannery @leecflannery


Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge

Tom Reichner / Shutterstock

Last year, an international group of scientists published an article in Science Advances proposing a "Global Deal for Nature," a plan to save biodiversity by protecting nearly 30% of the world's waters and lands by 2030. "They wrote that setting aside nearly one-third of the planet from human development could avert 'points of no return' for many species and ecosystems," reports Sammy Roth. The Convention on Biological Diversity is expected to adopt the preventative plan.

Roth reflects: "You may have heard the statistic that the U.S. loses a football field’s worth of nature every 30 seconds. The data point can start to sound meaningless if you hear it too often, but stop and think about it. Every 30 seconds? That’s astounding." California's recently Assembly Bill 3030 cites the statistic and sets state-wide legislation adopting the framework. 

Global Deal for Nature authors consider the "30 by 30" goal as a starting point, hoping to extend the effort to 50% by 2050.

 
 
 

Thursday, May 21, 2020 in Los Angeles Times

The New York Public Library's stone lions Patience and Fortitude have donned face masks to remind New Yorkers to wear face coverings during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Top Urban Planning Books of 2021

Planetizen's annual list of the top urban planning books of the year is here—maintaining a tradition that dates back to 2002.

November 26, 2021 - James Brasuell

Empty Road

The Roadway Expansion Paradox

Motorists want expensive roadway expansions provided that somebody else foots the bill, but when required to pay directly through tolls, the need for more capacity often disappears. What should planners do?

November 28, 2021 - Todd Litman

Moving

Urban Exodus: Data Don't Support the Popular Pandemic Narrative

Americans fled cities in waves during the pandemic, right? Not to so fast.

November 30, 2021 - Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University

Airplane aisle with seated passengers

Flight-Free Movement Grows in Europe

A burgeoning movement known as 'flight shame' calls on travelers to avoid air travel when possible as a method of fighting climate change.

1 hour ago - The Conversation

Bentonville, AR Central Avenue at night

Opinion: Northwest Arkansas Could Be the 'Next Austin'

The home of Walmart and the University of Arkansas could be poised to see growth as cities like Austin and Boise become less affordable.

December 5 - Bloomberg Opinion

Downtown Houston overlooking Interstate 45.

Contentious Houston Freeway Widening Project Inches Forward

Federal officials have given TxDOT the go-ahead to resume work on a small portion of a controversial interstate widening project in downtown Houston.

December 5 - The Houston Chronicle

Urban Design for Planners 1: Software Tools

This six-course series explores essential urban design concepts using open source software and equips planners with the tools they need to participate fully in the urban design process.

Hand Drawing Master Plans

This course aims to provide an introduction into Urban Design Sketching focused on how to hand draw master plans using a mix of colored markers.