Preservation and Redevelopment Can Work Hand in Hand

While historic preservation is often perceived to be a hinderance to development efforts, preserving buildings actually helps economic development, say advocates.
April 22, 2019, 2pm PDT | Camille Fink
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In a segment on the Cincinnati Edition show, Michael Monks discusses the perception that economic development and historic preservation efforts are always at odds. The modernist Terrace Plaza Hotel in downtown Cincinnati is an architectural icon, and preservationists are pushing for landmark designation to protect the building. They also want to make sure that any plans to redevelop the site respect its historic past.

"Preservation is economic development. As a matter of fact, it’s one the most powerful tools cities have at their disposal. The cities that are really prospering and growing around the country are ones that have a sense of authenticity and vitality, and they resonate with people," says Paul Muller of the Cincinnati Preservation Association.

Preservation has become an accepted redevelopment strategy because it stabilizes neighborhoods, helps increase property values, and creates jobs, notes Muller. "From the rebirth of century-old buildings in Over-the-Rhine, Covington and Newport, to more high-profile restorations of landmark spaces like Music Hall and Union Terminal, preservationists work to make their case that historic properties are worth saving," writes Monks.

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Published on Wednesday, April 3, 2019 in Cincinnati Edition
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