Land Use Regulations

2 days ago
A state bill would allow for higher floor area ratio in New York City, designed to alleviate housing costs in the city, has gained most support from legislators representing areas outside the city.
Crain's New York Business
March 30, 2018, 9am PDT
SB 827 is a controversial land use regulation under consideration in California that would relax building height and density standards along transit corridors. New York has a reputation as the most transit oriented city in the country.
RPA Lab
March 9, 2018, 6am PST
For many decades now, most communities in the United States have grown as a series of subdivisions, built on a tried and true formula. It might be time to change the math.
Strong Towns
November 26, 2017, 7am PST
Harris County, home to Houston and the scene of widespread devastation during Hurricane Harvey and other weather events, will make large-scale changes to development regulations on floodplains for the first time in almost 20 years.
Houston Chronicle
November 19, 2017, 11am PST
Drawing on a slew of examples, Dan Bertolet argues that Washington's State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) has been co-opted in ways that run against its original purpose: protecting the environment.
Sightline Institute
October 18, 2017, 2pm PDT
Most cities know they need new development regulations, but it's much, much easier said than done.
At Lincoln House
September 15, 2017, 8am PDT
Two economics professors from the University of Chicago and the University of California, Berkeley argue that the housing crisis doesn't just affect booming coastal cities. It's a national problem.
The New York Times - Opinion
September 2, 2017, 7am PDT
As the remnants of Hurricane Harvey headed for Louisville, city officials were approving new legislation that enacts more stringent development standards in areas in flood prone areas.
Courier-Journal
August 29, 2017, 12pm PDT
While strict, suburban-style regulations often get a bad rap for the lack of housing in high demand cities, the red tape and other obstacles that delay development could be the worst culprit.
Sightline Institute
July 25, 2017, 9am PDT
The Texas Legislature and executive branch is continuing to wage a battle against local control, this time pursuing a land use law that would undermine zoning code changes, such as the current CodeNEXT process in Austin.
Austin American-Statesman
July 18, 2017, 8am PDT
Venice, the famously picturesque neighborhood in Los Angeles, has become a poster child for wealthy urban enclave that has closed its doors to development and new residents—despite a strong local economy.
Fox Business
Blog post
June 28, 2017, 2pm PDT
Despite its medicinal benefits, cannabis will negatively impact the environment if we don’t plan accordingly.
Kayla Matthews
May 19, 2017, 8am PDT
An op-ed written by city officials from two South Bay Area cities argues that reform of land use regulations won't be enough to solve California's housing crisis.
The Mercury News
May 2, 2017, 1pm PDT
Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser discusses the research on local land use controls, and why it makes sense to reevaluate them. Successful approaches may start at the state level.
Brookings
April 16, 2017, 11am PDT
Self-storage buildings are multiplying across New York City, where local officials would prefer to protect and grow the city's base of manufacturing and industrial jobs.
The New York Times
April 16, 2017, 9am PDT
A large swatch of downtown and an adjacent neighborhood can develop taller and denser after the Seattle City Council approved zoning changes this week.
The Seattle Times
February 24, 2017, 9am PST
Grayson, Atlanta exemplifies the kind of administrative considerations that can make or break development approval processes.
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
February 20, 2017, 1pm PST
The city of Austin is looking for ways to keep all eyes on the state capitol building.
Austin Monitor
November 18, 2016, 11am PST
Comprehensive plans can be big and unwieldy. Luckily for Washington, D.C., there are two maps that unlock of the plan's meaning.
Greater Greater Washington
November 3, 2016, 8am PDT
Portland is expecting 123,000 new households in the city by 2035, so it's proposed a new residential infill policy to accommodate all those people. A new report argues, however, that the policy could have a chilling effect on infill development.
Oregon Public Broadcasting