Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

NIMBYism

August 7, 2019, 10am PDT
San Diego housing advocates have coined a new term: "YIGBY," or "Yes in God's Backyard," to advance prospects for affordable housing development on property underutilized by houses of worship. The city's planning department is receptive.
Next City
July 17, 2019, 12pm PDT
A study from the Boston Foundation shows that besides homelessness and housing costs, Massachusetts housing debt also fuels the racial wealth gap and segregation.
The Boston Globe
July 15, 2019, 7am PDT
In a scathing response to arguments in favor of a "slow growth" ordinance in Lakewood, Colorado, Mike Eliason rebukes the idea that capping growth is a green policy.
Medium
May 24, 2019, 8am PDT
Against opposition, the town of Durango, Colorado has successfully found a way to permit accessory dwelling units and legalize those that already existed under the radar.
CityLab
April 18, 2019, 12pm PDT
Current Texas law grants state representatives significant power over whether affordable developments receive federal tax credits. Controversially, several representatives have proposed the reduction of their own authority in that regard.
Next City
February 20, 2019, 2pm PST
A "white supremacist" law that blocks public housing in the state is up for repeal—again.
Los Angeles Times
January 4, 2019, 11am PST
In New Jersey, a cap-and-trade system existed for two decades and appeared to just perpetuate housing and social inequities. But now legislators and researchers are considering it again.
CityLab
October 14, 2018, 1pm PDT
Students from Beverly Hills staged a high-visibility "walkout" to protest L.A. Metro's extension of the Purple Line subway past Beverly Hills High School.
The Los Angeles Times
October 9, 2018, 12pm PDT
A San Jose Unified School District plan to relocate several schools and build affordable housing in their place has sparked controversy. The district says teachers increasingly can't afford to live in the area.
The Mercury News
October 6, 2018, 11am PDT
Steven Falk, city manager for 22 years of the East Bay enclave of Lafayette, expressed frustration with the city's resistance to infill development, calling it incompatible with addressing "the most significant challenges of our time."
SF Gate
Blog post
August 5, 2018, 1pm PDT
One common argument against building new housing in high cost cities is that people priced out of those cities can always move somewhere cheaper. This post responds to that claim.
Michael Lewyn
July 16, 2018, 6am PDT
The denizens of the luxury apartments near Central Park oppose the "expense" of a new homeless shelter.
New York Daily News
June 1, 2018, 12pm PDT
Cities can't have it both ways on the housing crisis, asserts an SF Chronicle editorial. Case in point: Berkeley passes a resolution to declare homelessness a state of emergency while opposing legislation to allow BART to develop its parking lots.
San Francisco Chronicle
January 29, 2018, 6am PST
A piecemeal, reactive approach to historic preservation in the capital may burden the future with too many buildings of "middling merit."
Greater Greater Washington
November 19, 2017, 11am PST
Drawing on a slew of examples, Dan Bertolet argues that Washington's State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) has been co-opted in ways that run against its original purpose: protecting the environment.
Sightline Institute
Blog post
November 12, 2017, 1pm PST
Rejecting the common argument that cities can never be affordable because of high construction costs.
Michael Lewyn
October 5, 2017, 8am PDT
A new law could enable affordable housing projects, if they meet the specified criteria, to bypass the public process that so often blocks their approval.
Los Angeles Daily News
September 15, 2017, 8am PDT
Two economics professors from the University of Chicago and the University of California, Berkeley argue that the housing crisis doesn't just affect booming coastal cities. It's a national problem.
The New York Times - Opinion
September 5, 2017, 12pm PDT
With the media rightfully pointing to Houston's sprawling urban development patterns that exacerbated the epic flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey, Paul Krugman also finds fault with cities where urban development is too tightly regulated.
The New York Times - Opinion
May 19, 2017, 10am PDT
Accepted by planners as a way to make buildings feel less 'crowded' and baked into many zoning codes, setbacks achieve no benefit other than giving opponents of development a bargaining chip.
California Planning & Development Report