Exclusives

Blog post
Yesterday
There are so many more ways to access local culture as a tourist or an urban explorer than ever before.
Kayla Matthews
Blog post
January 28, 2019, 5am PST
The world is changing, and city planners are changing along with it.
Kayla Matthews
Blog post
January 22, 2019, 10am PST
The Federal Highway Administration's National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) shows that transit use is rising and household vehicle miles traveled are declining—but other data sources paint a more ambiguous picture.
Michael Lewyn
Feature
January 22, 2019, 5am PST
The following excerpt, written by Daniel Kay Hertz in the introduction to The Battle of Lincoln Park, challenges assumptions about the forces of gentrification in Chicago, with lessons for communities around the country.
Daniel Kay Hertz
Blog post
January 17, 2019, 7am PST
Transportation engineers sometimes treat people as objects to be moved as quickly and cheaply as possible from one location to another, but people have preferences and feelings which should be considered when planning transport systems.
Todd Litman
Blog post
January 14, 2019, 2pm PST
Maybe, just maybe, Trump might also be willing to consider the decaying condition of U.S. infrastructure a matter of national security. And if Congress played along, perhaps we'd get a 2019 Infrastructure bill. That's how Eisenhower did it.
Robert Fischer
Feature
January 14, 2019, 5am PST
A few ideas about what to watch in the world of planning in 2019. We only use the word Trump once.
James Brasuell
Blog post
January 8, 2019, 9am PST
Despite the decline in gas prices, cars are still a luxury for many low-income Americans, and low-income zip codes still tend to have low car ownership rates.
Michael Lewyn
Feature
January 7, 2019, 10am PST
While the debate continues unabated on the influence of the physical and land use characteristics of a city on crime, a critical aspect is left out: resident transience. Jacobs took notice and feared its negative influence. Was she right?
Fanis Grammenos
Blog post
January 7, 2019, 8am PST
Transportation planning is undergoing a paradigm shift. The new paradigm is more multi-modal and comprehensive, and so can better respond to changing travel demands and emerging community needs.
Todd Litman
Blog post
January 3, 2019, 8am PST
Some thoughts on what we might have learned in 2018 and what it might mean going forward.
Steven Polzin
Blog post
January 2, 2019, 5am PST
Looking forward to 2019, Chuck Wolfe reflects on how time living in London—and exposure to many other places during 2018— has highlighted how the physical shell of the old often frames today's sociocultural realities around the world.
Charles R. Wolfe
Blog post
December 31, 2018, 5am PST
Electric scooter rentals will never be new again.
James Brasuell
Feature
December 27, 2018, 5am PST
We crunched the numbers on all the features, blog posts, and news articles we published in 2018 to figure out which made the biggest splash with readers.
James Brasuell
Blog post
December 21, 2018, 5am PST
Ten years ago I wrote "Graduate School 2008: Nuts and Bolts of Applying". As deadlines draw near for this year’s round of applications it is a good time to revisit and update this advice.
Ann Forsyth
Blog post
December 19, 2018, 9am PST
Government-subsidized housing is a useful complement to market-rate housing, but an affordability strategy that relies solely on low-income housing may be impractical.
Michael Lewyn
Feature
December 19, 2018, 7am PST
Planetizen's annual list of the most useful and innovative websites by and for planners (and every person interested in planning).
James Brasuell and Chris Steins
Blog post
December 14, 2018, 5am PST

There's still plenty of electric scooter news in the world.

James Brasuell
Blog post
December 13, 2018, 9am PST
Michael Hooper of Harvard University writes about a recent article in the Journal of Planning Education and Research
JPER
Feature
December 13, 2018, 5am PST
The 2018 edition of an annual playlist of songs about places by critically acclaimed and popular bands.
James Brasuell
Blog post
December 7, 2018, 8am PST

Few issues are more emotional, and therefore vulnerable to bad analysis, than urban crime risk. Solid research indicates that more compact and mixed development tends to increase neighborhood security. Jane Jacobs was right!

Todd Litman